BLOG

cleaning.jpg
31/Jan/2020

With our crazy, busy lives it can sometimes feel next to impossible to squeeze in time for exercise. Add to that the unpredictability of living with a chronic condition, and our planned activities can often go flying out the door.

But there are things you can do to be more active. Incidental exercise – or the little bits and pieces you do over the course of your day – can really add up. It’s important to note that incidental exercise should not replace your regular, structured exercise program, but they’re a great way to boost your activity levels.

Here are some things you can do to increase your incidental exercise.

  • Watching TV? Whether you’re watching the latest episode of your favourite show or binge watching an entire series, get up and move around during the ads. No ads? No problems. At the end of each episode, do something active. Go outside and check the letterbox. Take the dog for a walk around the block. If you have an exercise bike or treadmill, use it while watching your show.
  • Love reading? Download an audio book and listen to it as you go for a walk. Just be mindful about how far you walk. It’s easy to get caught up in a book and walk further than you planned! Which has the potential to aggravate your condition and pain levels if you do too much.
  • Going for a long drive? Make your journey more interesting, and more active by scheduling stops for you to stretch, walk around and discover new areas. It’s amazing what you can find when you take the time to explore.
  • Shopping? Park your car a little further away from the shops than you normally would. Walk up or down the travellator or escalator – even if it’s just for part of the ride – rather than just standing in place.
  • Work meeting? Take it outside. Suggest that you have walking meeting. You get to be active and less sedentary, with the added benefit of fresh air.
  • Catching public transport? Get off a stop before your usual one. Explore your neighbourhood while getting some exercise and breathing deeply.
  • On the phone? Walk around while chatting, rather than sitting down. But avoid moving about if you’re texting or looking at your screen. Our aim is to increase activity levels safely, not get injured in the process!
  • Gaming? Fun! But it’s so easy to get caught up in the heat of the battle/chase/adventure, so set your phone alarm to go off every 30 minutes so you can get up and move.
  • Cleaning? Go hard. Give the tiles an extra vigorous scrub. Flatten your recyclables rather than just tossing them straight into your recycling bin. Clean your windows (groan – but how good do they look when you’re done?). Vacuum the house and use all of the little attachments (who knew they made such a difference?).

Obviously there’ll be times when these activities are not possible or practical – especially if you’re having a flare. However some of them may actually help with your pain – things like standing and moving when your back is really sore, breaking up long trips with stops and stretches – they’ll provide exercise and pain relief.

Give incidental exercise a try. Before you know it, you’ll be feeling more energised and noticing a difference with your pain levels, sleep quality and mood.

Plus your house will be sparkling! Win-win!

More to explore


photo-1200x795.jpg
12/Sep/2019

The weather’s changing. You can smell the blossoms, the freesias and other spring flowers bursting into life. The days are getting longer. The sun’s shining and the temperature’s rising.

Hooray! I’m over winter. The time for hibernating is over. I just want to lose the winter woollies, say goodbye to soup and get out and about.

So I’ve made a list of all the things I want to do now that the weather is getting better. I’m going spring into spring! Here’s a few that may get you inspired:

  1. Get outdoors. We’re so lucky in Australia to have beautiful and accessible parks and gardens. Whether you’re into a gentle stroll, a brisk hike, a walk through history, or all of the above, there’s something there for you. A good place to start is the parks service website in your state or territory, your local council website, and the National Trust website.
  2. Try a new sport/exercise. If your exercise program has become boring, or you’re in a bit of an exercise rut, spring is the perfect time to blow off the cobwebs and try something new. Try trampolining, have a Frisbee tournament, learn to dance the samba/tango/tap/swing, borrow a bike and go for a ride, join a sporting team, go bird watching. The sky’s the limit. Just think about the types of things you enjoy doing, or sound fun to you, and incorporate them into your exercise program.
  3. Take part in a fun run/walk. This is the time of the year when fun runs and walks seem to happen every weekend. Find one that appeals to you – the location, the distance, the charity it supports – and sign yourself up. Even better sign up the family and friends as well!
  4. Volunteer your time and skills. Whether it’s something you do regularly or as a once off, volunteer work can be extremely rewarding for yourself and your community. Think about the types of things you’re passionate about, your skills, the amount of time you can give, and look around your local community to find the best match. Or visit the GoVolunteer website to search the database for volunteering opportunities.
  5. Grab your camera or phone and start snapping. It’s amazing the quality photos we can take on our phones. Post your pics on social media, and be inspired by others. Spring is the perfect time to get some gorgeous photos. And it’s amazing how differently you start seeing everyday things when you start imagining them through a camera lens. Things that once faded into the background become stunning architectural shapes, or vibrant vistas. Before you know it you’ll be experimenting with angles, perspective and light. If you need help, there’s plenty of tips and tricks online about taking photos with your phone. Or investigate photography courses in your local area. You’ll learn new skills and meet new people.
  6. Dig in the dirt. Many people find gardening a relaxing past-time, and it can distract us from our pain and our problems. So with our gardens coming alive, why not get out and get your hands dirty. Plant some bright flowers in pots or garden beds around the entrance to your house. Prune trees and shrubs and remove any dead winter growth. Add some mulch to the gardens beds. Then grab a cold drink, sit back and enjoy the fruits of your labours. Oh – and if you sometimes find your condition affects your ability to garden, check out this blog post.

More to explore

Photo by Maria Shanina on Unsplash.


2582-1200x800.jpg
26/May/2018

And that’s just what they’ll do

Walking is a great way to exercise. It costs nothing, it’s suitable for most people, and it gets you out and about.

I love walking. I take a quick walk around the block during the day if I can manage it, but I always make sure I get out after I get home from work. I find it’s a fantastic way to relax after a long day at work.

For me the important thing is to get changed and put my walking shoes on as soon as I get home. If I sit down, or get distracted by others, the opportunity disappears.

I grab my MP3 player, put on a podcast or music, and head out. The fresh air, the exercise, and listening to something interesting is a great mood booster.

On the weekend I like to explore new areas, so I hop in the car, pick up a friend, and we walk in a park, the bush, in the CBD, at the beach. This keeps my walks interesting, and I also have the benefit of discovering new places.

If you don’t exercise much, walking might be a good way for you to build up your activity levels – though be sure to talk with your doctor first to get the all-clear. Then start slow.

Try walking 30 minutes a day on most days of the week and you’ll really notice the health benefits. It can help you lose weight, or maintain a healthy weight, it can lift your mood, help you get a good night’s sleep, improve your bone and joint health and increase heart and lung fitness.

If you can’t walk 30 minutes at a time, break the walking up over your day. Three 10 minute walks, six 5 minute walks…it all adds up.

Walking tips

  • Wear comfortable, appropriate clothing and shoes.
  • Warm up and cool down to prevent injuries or pain.
  • Make it social – walk with a friend, your family, kids, the dog.
  • Listen to music, audio books, podcasts.
  • Make it a part of your regular routine – go at the same time each day – e.g. after/before work, after lunch.
  • Explore new places to walk.
  • Take a water bottle – it can be thirsty work!
  • Track your walking with a pedometer or fitness activity tracker.
  • Increase the distance of your walks and intensity of your walks over time.
  • Take your walk inside if it’s raining or a hot day – walk in a shopping centre, around the office, around your house.
  • Join a walking or bushwalking group.

So what are you waiting for? Grab your walking shoes and get out there!




Musculoskeletal Australia (or MSK) is the consumer organisation working with, and advocating on behalf of, people with arthritis, osteoporosis, back pain, gout and over 150 other musculoskeletal conditions.

Useful Links


Key Conditions

Copyright by Musculoskeletal Australia 2018. All rights reserved

ABN: 26 811 336 442ACN: 607 996 921