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10/Sep/2020

Last issue we talked about spring cleaning our physical environment. There’s nothing like a thorough purge of your home or office, and the sense of satisfaction when everything is clean and organised just the way you like it 😊.

But it’s also a really good time to start thinking about how you can spring clean yourself – your body, mind and spirit.

2020 has been a really tough year and it’s not over yet.

We’ve been isolated, locked down, separated from loved ones, working from home (or lost work 😢) and home schooling. Through it all we’ve done the best we can to cope with a really difficult situation. But that takes a toll on us – physically and mentally – especially if you’re living with a chronic condition, pain and fatigue.

So let’s take advantage of the warmer days and the extra downtime many of us are dealing with and look at how we can sweep away the cobwebs and make ourselves sparkle this spring!

  • Unplug. We’re always connected these days, immersed in the news, social media, video chats, work/school, phone calls. We’re never far away from a phone, tablet or computer – and we need to step away. Schedule time to put it all aside: perhaps after dinner, or for an hour during your day, or for your entire Sunday. Whatever works for you and your commitments. Just make sure you take some time away from the digital world, step outside and breathe in the fresh, sweet smelling spring air 😊.
  • Say no. We’re wired to want to please others, so we often find it difficult to say no. But that can make us become overwhelmed and stressed with the number of commitments we have. That’s why we need to look after ourselves and start saying no. The next time someone asks you to do something, give yourself a moment. Don’t answer immediately with an automatic ‘yes’. Ask yourself if this is something you want to do? Are you able to do it – physically and mentally? Do you have the time to do it? Will it bring you happiness? If you answered no to these questions, then you should say no to the request. You may disappoint some people and they may be a little unhappy with you. But you need to be true to who you are and stand firm. And don’t feel the need to give detailed reasons for saying no. Saying no is really hard, but it will become easier.
  • Change your routine. Do you feel like you’re stuck in a rut? I know it feels like Groundhog Day at times! So look at your routine. What can you change? Take your work/school commitments out of the equation for now. Do you spend your evenings on the couch? Or weekends doing the same old things? Stop and really think about what you would actually ‘like’ to do with your free time. Go for a bike ride? Take up painting? Visit a new place each week? Find things that you enjoy, and fill you with anticipation and happiness, and do them. Now think about your work routine. There may not be things you can change about work – but why not put on your favourite outfit/earrings/shoes/lipstick – even if you’re working from home. Or use some new stationary or bit of tech. It’s amazing how these small changes give us a mental boost 🤗
  • Focus on the basics – eat well, move, sleep – repeat. This time of the year we have access to amazing fresh produce that’s just crying out to be made into delicious salads and stir fries. The days are getting longer and warmer so we can get outside more for our exercise. We can shed the heavy blankets and adjust our sleep habits. There’s never been a better time than now to focus on these basics and make improvements if needed. And finally, make sure you’re staying hydrated by drinking enough water each day.
  • Surround yourself with positive, upbeat people. Positivity and happiness is contagious. And in the midst of a pandemic – this is the kind of contagion we need 😉. These people will inspire you, make you feel good about yourself and the world in general. Too much contact with negative people (in person and via social media) does the opposite and makes the world a gloomy place. So seek out the happy, positive people and enjoy their company. And if you can, ditch the negative people.
  • Take some time out to relax. Try strategies like mindfulness, visualisation and guided imagery. Or read a book, listen to music, walk the dog, create something, play a computer game, have a bubble bath or massage. Whatever relaxes you. And make sure you do these things on a regular basis. They’re not an indulgence – they’re a necessity and vital to our overall happiness and wellbeing.
  • Let’s get serious – sugar, fats, alcohol and drugs. Many of us have been seeking comfort in sugary and/or fatty foods more than we’d like. Or we’ve been using alcohol and/or drugs to make us feel better. Over time this becomes an unhealthy habit. So it’s time to get serious. Ask yourself if your intake of these things has changed or increased? If it has – what do you need to do to fix this? Can you decrease their use by yourself? Or do you need help from your family, doctor or other health professional? The sooner you acknowledge there’s a problem, the sooner you can deal with it.
  • Nurture your relationships. It’s easy to take the people around us for granted, but these people support and care for us day in and day out. They deserve focused time and attention from us. So sit down and talk with your kids about their day. Make time for a date night with your partner and cook a special meal to share together. Call or visit your parents and see how they’re really doing. Reminisce with your siblings about childhood antics and holidays. Our relationships are the glue that holds everything together for us – so put in the effort. You’ll all feel so much better for it ✨.
  • Quit being so mean to yourself. You’re valued and loved 💖. But sometimes we forget that. And the negative thoughts take over. “I’m fat”, “I’m hopeless”, “I’m lazy”, “I’m a burden” 😢. If you wouldn’t say these things to another person, then why are you saying them to yourself? Ask yourself why you even think these things? And how can you reframe these thoughts? If, for example, you tell yourself you’re fat – are you actually overweight or are you comparing yourself to the unrealistic media image of how a person should look? And if you do know you need to lose weight, and want to make that happen, put those steps in motion. Talk with your doctor for some guidance and help. And congratulate yourself for taking action. And as you make these changes be kind to yourself along the journey. There will be stumbles, but that’s expected. You can pick yourself up and move on. Kindly.
  • Throw away the ‘should’s. This is similar to the negative self-talk…we need to stop should-ing ourselves to death. This often happens after we’ve been on social media and seen someone’s ‘amazing’ life. You start thinking “I should be better at X”, “I should be doing X”, “I should be earning X”, “I should look like X”. Remember that most people only put their best images on social media, so everyone’s life looks wonderful. But you’re just seeing the superficial, filtered person, not the whole, and they probably have just as many insecurities as the rest of us. Instead of thinking “I should…”, be grateful for who you are and what you have.
  • Be thankful and grateful. You exist! And yes, the world is a strange and sometimes frightening place at the moment, but you’re here to see it. People love and care for you. Focus on the people in your life and the things you’re grateful to have in your life. Celebrating these things – both big and small – reminds us why we’re here. To bring joy and happiness to those around us, and to make the world a better place 👨‍👩‍👧‍👧👨‍👨‍👦‍👦👩‍👧👪.

Call our Help Line

If you have questions about things like managing your pain, COVID-19, your musculoskeletal condition, treatment options, telehealth, or accessing services be sure to call our nurses. They’re available weekdays between 9am-5pm on 1800 263 265; email (helpline@msk.org.au) or via Messenger.

More to explore


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13/Aug/2020

I know, I know. We talk about exercise a lot.

But as anyone with a musculoskeletal condition knows, exercise is such an important tool for managing your condition. It keeps your joints moving, it’s vital for bone health, it helps you manage your pain, weight, mood, sleep. It’s practically magic! 😉

However during these weird times, many of us are probably not exercising enough. Our routines are all over the place, we’re working from home/not working/or working strange shifts. There are restrictions (depending on where you live) around going to the gym or the pool, team sports, catching up with friends for exercise or even leaving your home. And because we have to stay at home as much as possible, we’re not getting as much incidental exercise as we once did – such as walking around shopping centres, commuting to work, walking to a colleagues office. That means many of us are more sedentary and becoming unfit and deconditioned. This’s a big problem.

So even though we’re six months into this pandemic in Australia, we need to take stock and be honest with ourselves. Ask yourself – “are you really doing as much exercise as you can?”

Or have you gotten into a routine (I know I have) where it’s easier to stay cooped up indoors, working, watching TV and avoiding exercise outdoors in the cold, wet, COVID-winter? If you answered “no, I’m not doing as much exercise as I could” (like me), what can you do about it?

Steps to becoming more active

  1. The first step was admitting it. Well done!
  2. Now, look at the barriers to exercise. What’s stopping you? This may include things like a lack of time, the weather, being worried about being in public with others, not having access to your usual exercise outlets such as the gym, not feeling motivated.
  3. Once you’ve identified the problem/s, it’s time to do some problem solving. Let’s say the issue you identified is a lack of time. That’s always a tough one. When we have so many things competing for our time and attention, exercise often gets pushed to the bottom of our list of priorities. But it’s important we make it a priority as it has so many benefits for our physical and mental wellbeing. So here are some simple steps to help you come up with some solutions:
    • Identify the problem – done. Don’t have time to exercise.
    • Brainstorm possible solutions and write them down, e.g. exercise in the morning, exercise after work/school, exercise for small periods of time several times a day (e.g. 3 exercise sessions that last 10 minutes each), set reminders on your watch/phone to remind you to get up and move.
    • Choose one and try it. Evaluate how well it works for you. Make sure you give it a solid attempt. Don’t stop after only one try.
    • If it didn’t work out so well, choose another solution and try it.
    • Keep going until you find the solution that works for you.
    • Make it a part of your daily routine.
    • And keep it at the forefront of your mind. Don’t let it slip off the radar again. It may help to write a note on your fridge, bathroom mirror, or the back of the toilet door 😁. Visual clues help us stay motivated.

Motivation

Getting and staying motivated is often a big challenge when it comes to becoming more active. It’s cold, you’re in pain, you miss exercising with your friends, you can’t be bothered – there can be so many reasons why our motivation to exercise disappears. Especially if we haven’t been exercising regularly for a while. Here are some tips to help you if your motivation has gone south for the winter:

  • Remind yourself of the benefits of regular exercise – pain management, improved fitness, joint mobility, muscle strength, better balance, improved sleep and mood, weight management.
  • Add it to your routine. Just like you know you’ll always clean your teeth every morning, make exercise a regular part of your day. It should become that habitual. It may take some time, but if you do it regularly, it will become a habit.
  • Plan to do it when you know you feel the best. If you know you’re generally stiff and sore when you wake up, don’t schedule your exercise routine for the early morning. Schedule it for a time you know you’re feeling loose and limber.
  • Do something you enjoy. You’re more likely to continue to do it if you enjoy it and look forward to it.
  • Exercise with someone – if you have others in your household, include them. They need exercise too! If you live on your own, do some virtual exercise with friends or family. Connect with them over the phone or video and exercise together. Call someone while you both go for a walk – so you not only exercise together, but you get to catch up (just be sure you’re moving at a pace that makes you huff and puff a little – though not so much you can’t speak).
  • Exercise on your own – if you have others in your household, this can be a great way to get some alone time. We’re living in tight quarters at the moment and going a little stir crazy 😜. Scheduling time every day (even if it’s only 10 minutes) will give you time to refresh, breathe and retain your sanity.
  • Make sure you do a variety of exercise – you don’t want to get stuck in a rut. That’s boring and you’re more likely to stop doing something that bores you. Look online at the different exercise videos offering everything from Bollywood dancing, yoga, tai chi, chair exercises and more (see the More to Explore section below for more info. And make sure you read our blog about evaluating online videos for safety and quality.
  • Track what you’re doing. Use a tracking app, a pedometer or a notebook – whatever works – but make sure you track how you’re going over time. Seeing how far you’ve come and how you’ve improved is an amazing feeling. And it motivates you to keep going and challenging yourself 😊.
  • Continue to challenge yourself and increase the intensity of your exercise as your fitness improves. It’ll make your exercise more interesting, and also have greater health benefits.
  • Don’t set yourself up to fail. It’s easy when you’re gung ho and ready to make a change to set unrealistic goals, for example 10,000 steps every day or an hour of aerobic exercise 5 times a week. Or you may attempt to do something you used to be able to do pre-COVID. That may no longer be achievable at the moment, which can be a little disheartening 😥. If you haven’t been exercising regularly, start slow and increase your steps/distance/time gradually.
  • Set goals. Having a clear goal can really motivate you to stay on track with your exercise program. Make sure your goal is SMARTSpecific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic and have a Timeframe. For example, your goal may be to walk a lap around your local park, a distance of 3.5kms. You want to be able to do this without stopping within a month. You plan to do this by walking short distances each day, and going slightly further every day. This goal is specific – it states exactly what the goal is; you can measure it – both time and distance; it’s achievable – as it lists the steps for how it’ll be done; it’s realistic – it gives you a realistic time frame to do it in so they can build up your fitness and endurance; and it has a timeframe. For more info about goal setting read our blog.
  • Make it enjoyable – listen to music, podcasts, audio books when you go for your walk.
  • Reward yourself. Especially if you’ve exercised even though you didn’t feel like it. That’s amazing! You should be proud of yourself. Have a bubble bath. Give yourself a foot massage (or better yet have some else do it). Call a friend just for a chat.

Variety is the spice of life

To get the most out of exercise, you should include a variety of different exercises that help with:

  • flexibility – stretching and range of movement exercises help maintain or improve the flexibility of your joints and nearby muscles. They’ll help keep your joints moving properly and ease joint stiffness.
  • strength – to build muscle strength, provide stability to your joints, improve your bone health and improve your ability to perform daily tasks.
  • overall fitness – exercise that gets you moving and increases your heart rate (e.g. walking, swimming, cycling) will help improve the health of your heart and lungs and can also help with endurance, weight loss, prevention of other health problems (e.g. diabetes). This type of exercise is also called aerobic exercise, cardiovascular exercise or ‘cardio’.

Types of exercise

There are so many ways you can exercise so that you enjoy the benefits listed above. It’s really a matter of finding the things you enjoy doing. So why not try:

  • online exercises – so many gyms and fitness instructors have moved their classes online due to COVID so you’re sure to find some that will appeal to you
  • tai chi, Pilates, yoga – again try online videos/classes, or go ‘old school’ and borrow DVDs from your local library
  • swimming, exercises in water – if you live near the beach, have your own pool or the public pools have reopened
  • ride a bike, scooter, skates, skateboard
  • tennis, cricket, basketball
  • croquet, lawn bowls – you can get all the equipment you need to play these in your own backyard or park
  • active video games – for example WII Fit, Nintendo Switch
  • walk the dog (or cat 😹)
  • skipping rope – by yourself or get the family involved – double Dutch anyone? 😲
  • strength training using free weights and resistance bands
  • dancing/playing air guitar…rock on!

Note: not all of these options will be available for everyone at the moment. It’ll depend on where you live and the current COVID restrictions.

Tips to stay safe

Exercise is really important for good health, but we need to be careful we don’t get hurt or exacerbate an existing condition. Here are some tips to help keep you safe:

  • see your doctor before starting any new exercise program. If you’ve had a joint replaced, find out from your surgeon or health professional which movements you should limit or avoid.
  • talk to a physiotherapist or exercise physiologist – in person or via telehealth – if you need specific help, or want an exercise program tailored to your specific needs and health conditions.
  • don’t exercise a painful, inflamed or hot joint. Instead, gently move the joint through its range of movement to help reduce stiffness and improve circulation.
  • start gently and increase the intensity of your exercise program gradually over weeks or months.
  • always warm up and cool down.
  • pay attention to good technique and try to move smoothly. Don’t force a joint beyond a comfortable range of movement.
  • if you’re short of breath or in pain, ease back on the intensity of your exercise.
  • if your joint feels particularly painful afterwards (for longer than two hours after an exercise session), reduce the intensity of your next exercise session.
  • if an activity causes you pain or increases your pain beyond what’s normal for you, then stop this activity.
  • drink plenty of fluids during and after exercising.
  • wear appropriate clothing and footwear when exercising.
  • practise good COVID habits – wear your mask (if applicable), follow restrictions, maintain physical distancing (at least 1.5 metres), don’t exercise if you’re sick and don’t leave your home if you have tested positive to COVID.

Contact our free national Help Line

If you have questions about things like managing your pain, COVID-19, your musculoskeletal condition, treatment options, telehealth or accessing services be sure to call our nurses. They’re available weekdays between 9am-5pm on 1800 263 265; email (helpline@msk.org.au) or via Messenger.

More to explore


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08/Apr/2020

Cast your mind back just a few short months when the thought of hanging out at home with no obligations would’ve been a wonderful dream. Relaxing, feet up on the couch, a cheeky afternoon nap…ah, the serenity. Now that we have to stay at home, we’re all finding it a little harder than we thought it would be to stay sane and entertained.

So our team have come up with a bunch of things you can do at home this Easter long weekend, and into the coming months. Apologies (sorry, not sorry) this is another long one!

Play – with your kids, pets, partner. Now’s the perfect time to let your inner child loose, play and have fun! Rediscover chasey (the dogs love that one), play hide and seek, build a blanket fort in your lounge, play footy in the backyard, play SH Health’s Easter Bingo, take part in the wheely bin challenge. 

Learn – about the world, a new skill, language, art, culture, history, society. There are so many organisations providing online learning courses, and many of them are free. Just search online using your favourite search engine, and explore what’s available. Also check out Laneway Learning, MOOCs (massive open online courses), TAFEs and colleges, community houses. You’ll come out of this pandemic with so much knowledge you’ll wow everyone at your next trivia night 🤣.

Read – OK complete disclosure here – I’m a librarian, so I love reading and want everyone to enjoy reading too 😊. Now is a great time to read that book you’ve always wanted to, or the one your friends have been going on about. You can read so many books online, or you can you can listen to audio books. Some are free, others you’ll have to pay for. Or go through the pile of books and magazines you have at home. Reread your favourites, share them with your family, create a bookclub and discuss what you loved. And don’t forget to check out your local library to access eBooks and audio books.

Travel – one of our MSK Kids families is travelling the world by having different themed dinners and dressing up. So far they’ve been to India, Malaysia, USA, Thailand 💚. You can travel online and visit cultural and historical collections around the world, zoos and galleries, explore travel blogs, watch documentaries. It’s amazing how much of the world you can experience from home.

Worship – we’re entering an important period of celebration and significance for many faiths. But we can’t gather at our churches, temples, mosques, synagogues and other places of worship with our family and friends. The good news is that a lot of them are going online. Contact your place of worship or search online to see what events are being streamed and when. Gather with your extended family and friends virtually after worship to celebrate together. It’s going to be different, and it’ll be challenging for many of us, but we can still celebrate the things that are important to us.

Create – draw, sing, paint, write, dance. Take a tip from The Sound of Music and put on a concert or puppet show. All you need to start is an idea. Then go online to see what you need (if anything) and how to move your creation forward. And don’t forget to check out Pinterest. Wow, that’s an amazing rabbit hole you’ll fall into for hours!

Donate – blood, plasma, goods, money…whatever you have to offer. As far blood and plasma go Australian Red Cross Lifeblood is still open and are a VERY essential service. So if you’ve never donated blood and/or plasma, and you’re healthy and well, they could really use yours right now. And if it’s been a while since you’ve donated, it’s time to head back there. Check out their website for more info to see if you’re eligible.

Play some more
– do a jigsaw, create a Lego masterpiece, play board games. You can do many of these things online or using an app, or brush off the games you have at the top of the cupboard in your spare room. Challenge your friends to online games like Words with Friends (if you’re a nanna like me) or some very cool multiplayer games like Fortnite. Stay connected with your friends or meet new people online and have a great time!

Connect – call your parents, your aunt, your brother, your friend from high school. Or reach out via social media. Everyone’s isolated so let’s lessen that by staying connected with the people we love, and reconnect with those we’ve lost track of.

Organise – your cupboards, garage, the weird space under the house, your finances. Wherever you have mess or chaos, what better time than now to get these things in order?

Clean – on a similar note, clean. Clean out the old things you don’t need, want or use, Save them for when you can go to the op shop and donate them. Or prepare your online ads for when you can go back to selling online*. And once you’ve sorted through this stuff, physically clean your space. Give everything a good dose of elbow grease.
*Note – we’re working under the assumption that selling your goods is not an essential reason for leaving your home (e.g. to post something or for someone to visit your house to collect something.

Camp –it’s a much loved tradition in Australia for the Easter long weekend. You can still do it, just camp in your backyard or in the lounge.

Review – your insurance, your Will, finances, energy providers and telecommunications providers. Not nearly as fun as camping 😁 but it’s important, and we never seem to have time for this kind of stuff. Until now.

Cook – we have endless online resources to help us create the perfect meal, try a new recipe, bake a cake or make chocolate crackles. Get the kids involved, make a delicious mess and have fun!

Listen – to each other, audio books, podcasts, music. Take time to really immerse yourself in whatever it is you’re listening to.

Write – a book, blog, journal, your family history. Whatever takes your fancy. Sit in front of the computer or grab a notepad and pen (or quill if you’re feeling fancy) and just get it all out. I find the best way to get started is to just do it…throw words down, have a brain dump, then reread it and edit after you’ve written something. Don’t tie yourself up in knots reading as you’re writing. You can edit when you take a break from the creative process.

Research – your family history, a place for your next holiday, info about your health condition, life, the universe and everything. By now you may have guessed that there are a lot of resources online. Try the state and national libraries, archives, commercial ancestry websites, travels sites, our website, museum websites. There’s so much information out there. The world really is your oyster when you have the time and inclination to do some online searching and exploring.

Garden – create a new garden, resurrect an old one, plant some pots, mow the lawn. Whatever you enjoy and gets you outside and into the fresh air. Then sit back and admire your handiwork. It’s such a satisfying feeling!

Meditate – with all the online stuff we’ve been suggesting, as well as all the noise of the constant media, work, school and everyone living in tight quarters at home, it can be overwhelming, exhausting and LOUD! So take some time out to be quiet. Why not try some mindfulness meditation? Or just sit quietly in your yard? Get the rest of the household involved, and make it a part of your new routine. Your mental health will thank you for these moments of stillness and reflection.

Exercise – well der. Clearly that’s a no-brainer, but it has to be included in our list. And exercise is one of the magical reasons you’re allowed to leave your home at the moment. But it does have to be in compliance with the restrictions in place in Australia, and any further restrictions in your state or territory.

Volunteer – there are many charities, community groups, schools and other organisations that depend on volunteers. And a lot of their volunteer work can be done from home. Check out what’s available by visiting the Volunteering Australia website, or contacting your school, sporting clubs and other local groups.

With all that we’ve offered here, and really it’s just the tip of the iceberg, we hope we’ve inspired you with some interesting, fun, challenging, thought-provoking things to do while in iso.

Have fun, stay safe, stay home and take care of each other.


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31/Jan/2020

If you live with persistent pain, then you’ve probably had many nights when sleep has eluded you. You’ve tossed and turned, gotten up, watched TV, checked your phone, gone back to bed, and then tossed some more.

Pain, muscle tension, anxiety and other factors can interfere with your ability to get to sleep, stay asleep and the quality of your sleep. And sadly, not getting enough good quality sleep can affect your pain levels, your muscle tension and your anxiety levels.

It’s like a colossal feedback loop that’s spiraling out of control and you can’t break free. OK, that was a little dramatic, but I’m also a little tired and cranky 🙁

The good news is there are many things you can do to break this cycle and get back to having a good night’s sleep.

  • Try not to put too much pressure on yourself to go to sleep. This leads to anxiety and stress if you don’t fall asleep quickly. Feeling anxious or stressed will affect your ability to sleep. Get out of bed. Don’t lie in bed tossing and turning. Have a warm drink (e.g. milk, no caffeine), do some gentle stretches or breathing exercises and go back to bed when you feel more comfortable.
  • Develop a sleep routine. Try to go to bed and get up at the same time each day.
  • Try some relaxation techniques. Consider mindfulness, visualisation, deep breathing or a warm bath before bed. These techniques will help you become more relaxed and may help you manage your pain better so that you go to sleep, and sleep well.
  • Write it down. Thoughts, worries and anxiety can prevent good sleep. Don’t take them to bed. Write them down and then put them away. You can deal with them tomorrow.
  • Be active during the day. As well as the many other benefits of regular exercise, it will help you fall asleep and stay asleep longer.
  • Keep a sleep journal. This will help you and your doctor work out what may be causing your sleep problems because it tracks the things that may affect your sleep. Make sure to write down things like the time you went to bed, the time you got up the next morning, how easily (or not) you fell asleep, how many times you woke up and for how long, things that woke you up (full bladder, outside noise, anxiety, pain etc).
  • Keep a water bottle by your bedside so that you don’t have to get up if you wake up thirsty in the middle of the night.
  • Avoid caffeine and alcohol for several hours before going to bed.
  • Don’t look at the clock. Constantly checking the time can make you anxious and anxiety makes it hard to sleep. Try removing your clock from the bedside, or cover it up at night.
  • Avoid using technology in bed. The blue light from laptops and tablets suppresses the hormone (melatonin) that makes us sleepy at night, so be sure to stop screen use at least one hour before bed.
  • Light. Is your room dark enough to allow you to sleep well? If not, look at solutions such as window coverings or a dim switch on your alarm clock. You might also try using an eye mask.
  • Noise. If you have no control over the noise in your environment (e.g. a barking dog, loud party, your partner’s snoring), ear plugs may be an option. Or playing soothing, gentle music softly in the background can also be helpful at cancelling out other noises.
  • Clear your bedroom of clutter. Researchers have found a link between being surrounded by lots of “stuff” and your ability to fall asleep quickly and easily.
  • Seek help. If pain is constantly keeping you awake at night, discuss it with your doctor for information and advice.

More to explore

  • Read our more detailed page on sleep.

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23/Jan/2020

Using humour and laughter to help manage your pain

I think there’s a reason we respond so positively to the memes, social media posts and jokes that poke fun at pain, chronic illness and the trials and tribulations that come from living with both.

Having a foggy brain isn’t particularly funny, being unable to sleep isn’t a joke, and pain – wow, that’s probably the un-funniest thing you can think of. But we all do tend to laugh at, and share with others, the well-crafted meme or social media post that ridicules and scoffs at these things because we identify with the truth behind them. And with the best ones, you can tell that someone who knows what it’s like to live with pain and illness has created them. You’re recognising a fellow traveller.

Laughter and humour are such powerful forces. Just think about the last time you had one of those huge, spontaneous belly laughs with your friends or family. Something was said, a joke was told or you all saw something ridiculous. There’s nothing like it. You snort, you chortle, your eyes water, you gasp for breath, your belly starts to hurt and, when you look at each other, you laugh some more. When you finally do stop, you feel euphoric. Everything seems better, you feel happier and you can’t wait to do it again.

Always laugh when you can. It is cheap medicine. – Lord Byron

However when you’re in the grips of pain, laughing is probably the last thing you feel like doing. But laughter can actually help you deal with your pain. A good joke, a funny movie or just seeing something silly can distract you from your pain and make you feel better, at least for a while.

A good laugh heals a lot of hurts. – Madeleine L’Engle

Laughter causes a variety of chemical responses in your body. The ‘feel good’ hormones – endorphins, serotonin and dopamine – are released into your bloodstream. They boost your mood and make you feel more positive. Endorphins are your body’s natural pain reliever. Releasing them into the body reduces your feelings of pain. Laughter can also help boost your immune system. And, let’s face it, it’s just a lot of fun!

So next time your pain is getting you down, why not give laughter a go?

Finally, it’s important to remember that laughter and humour are temporary distractions from pain. They’re great and we should definitely cram as much into our day just for the sheer joy of it. But when you have a chronic illness and persistent pain, a balanced treatment approach that involves appropriate medications and medical care, healthy lifestyle, exercise, mindfulness and yes – laughter – is the best way to live with a chronic condition.

Laughter serves as a blocking agent. Like a bulletproof vest, it may help protect you against the ravages of negative emotions that can assault you in disease. – Norman Cousins

Things to try:

  • watch/stream a funny movie, TV show
  • listen to a funny podcast
  • talk with a friend and reminisce about a funny experience you had together
  • watch cat/dog/panda videos on YouTube (you know the ones you see pop up on social media regularly!)
  • think about the funniest joke you ever heard.

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01/Feb/2019

We all get tired. We overdo things and feel physically exhausted. It happens to us all.

But something that most of us living with a chronic, painful condition experience, and that can be hard for others to really understand, is fatigue.

Fatigue’s that almost overwhelming physical and mental tiredness. It may be caused by lack of sleep, your medications, depression, your actual condition (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis) or just the very fact of living with persistent pain.

Fatigue can make everyday activities seem too hard, and can get in the way of you doing the things you enjoy. The good news is there’re many things you can do to manage fatigue.

They include:

  • Exercise and being active – while this may sound like the last thing you should do when you’re feeling fatigued, exercise can boost your energy levels, help you sleep better, improve your mood, and it can help you manage your pain. If you’re starting an exercise program, start slowly, listen to your body and seek advice from qualified professionals.
  • Frankie says relax – listening to music, reading a book, taking a warm bubble bath, meditating, deep breathing, visualisation, gardening, going for a walk…they’re just some of the ways you can relax. By using relaxation techniques, you can reduce stress and anxiety (which can make you feel fatigued), and feel more energised.
  • Eating a well-balanced diet – this gives your body the energy and nutrients it needs to work properly, helps you maintain a healthy weight, protects you against other health conditions and is vital for a healthy immune system. Make sure you drink enough water, and try and limit the amount of caffeine and alcohol you consume.
  • Pace yourself. It’s an easy trap to fall into. On the days you feel great you do as much as possible – you push on and on and overdo it. Other days you avoid doing things because fatigue has sapped away all of your energy. By pacing yourself you can do the things you want to do by finding the right balance between rest and activity. Some tips for pacing yourself: plan your day, prioritise your activities (not everything is super important or has to be done immediately), break your jobs into smaller tasks, alternate physical jobs with less active ones, and ask for help if you need it.
  • Get a good night’s sleep – it makes such a difference when you live with pain and fatigue. It can sometimes be difficult to achieve, but there are many things you can do to sleep well, that will decrease your fatigue and make you feel human again.
  • Talk with your doctor about your meds – sometimes fatigue can be caused by medications you’re taking to manage another health condition. If you think your medications are causing your fatigue, talk with your doctor about alternatives that may be available.

So that’s fatigue…it can be difficult to live with, but there are ways you can learn to manage it. Tell us how you manage. Share your tips for managing fatigue.


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27/May/2018

A book by people like you

Chronic pain is a common and complex problem that affects 1 in 5 Australians.

It’s exhausting, a bit tricky and hard to know where to start.

Fortunately, with our book Managing your pain: An A-Z guide you can start anywhere!

Medications, sleep, laughter, fatigue, breathing. Think of it as a ‘choose your own adventure’ to getting on top of your pain.

The book emphasises practical strategies tried and tested by people like you – consumers living with musculoskeletal conditions. There are also a bunch of quotes and useful insights to keep it real.

You might also like…

We also have a helpful kids pain book called The worst pain in the world. It’s beautifully illustrated and loaded with practical advice for children living with pain (not just those with arthritis). It also gives kids who don’t live with pain an understanding of what their friends or family are going through.




Musculoskeletal Australia (or MSK) is the consumer organisation working with, and advocating on behalf of, people with arthritis, osteoporosis, back pain, gout and over 150 other musculoskeletal conditions.

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