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25/Jun/2020

This strange time we’re living through has forced us to live smaller. SARS-CoV-2 is going to hang around for quite some time, so our way of living will likely remain on the small scale for the foreseeable future.

And as we’ve seen with the spike in active cases in Victoria, restrictions can be eased and they can be tightened again. Trips overseas are out and trips interstate are dependent on state borders being open. Even travelling across our own state may be subject to restrictions if outbreaks continue.

It’s easy to feel a little despondent about the whole situation. It’s been a hard slog with no end in sight.

So it’s important we take some time to sit back and take stock. We’ve adapted to isolation and the massive changes in our world. We’ve been creative and done things that we couldn’t even imagine we would’ve done this time last year. We should give ourselves credit for that and continue to discover the small joys in life.

Like having a jigsaw on the go on the kitchen or coffee table that everyone adds to as they walk past. I can’t tell you how many people have told me they’ve been doing this…and how much satisfaction they get when they complete a tricky 1,000 piece puzzle.

Or discovering the parks, paths and until now unexplored areas in our neighbourhoods. Foot power and pedal power has us discovering many hidden treasures we never knew existed before COVID.

We’ve enjoyed cooking and creating meals together. Discovering an interesting recipe, trying new ingredients, and taking time to sit down together and talk, laugh and have fun. With the change in our routines, and the lack of social/sporting/school/work gatherings, we have a little more time to break away from the mundane meals of the past, at least occasionally. Turn the TV off, put some music on, enjoy the company and the meal.

We’ve hauled the dusty board games out of the back of cupboards and spent hours playing and enjoying time together…unless it’s Monopoly. It always seems to start well, then ends in tears 😁. We’re reading, planting vegie gardens, catching up on new TV shows, enjoying a cup of tea in the garden, doing the crossword together – basically living much more simply.

We’re catching up with friends and family with long phone calls and video chats. I think this’s been one of the best things that has come out of the pandemic. Without the distractions of work, social obligations, kids sports and the busyness of pre-COVID life, we have a bit more time to catch up and really talk. This has been wonderful 😊.

And for those of us with a chronic condition, being able to stay home has allowed us to feel safe from the virus, but has also given us the time to reevaluate how we’re travelling. For example, how’s our pain management? Do we need to tweak something, try something new? Are we looking after our mental health? Should we try some mind-body techniques such as mindfulness or guided imagery? This pandemic has paused the world in some ways, but it’s given us an opportunity to check our health and wellbeing.

This time will pass. It’s going to take a while, but we can adapt. We’ve been doing it for months, and we can continue to do it. And rediscovering the small joys in our world will help us get through.

Contact our free national Help Line

If you have questions about things like COVID-19, your musculoskeletal condition, treatment options, telehealthmanaging your pain or accessing services be sure to call our nurses. They’re available weekdays between 9am-5pm on 1800 263 265; email (helpline@msk.org.au) or via Messenger.

More to explore


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18/Jun/2020

As a species we’re social creatures. We need our tribe – whether it’s a large extended family group and lots of friends, a small intimate group of nearest and dearest, or somewhere in between. We need our connections.

I think that’s one of the hardest things we’ve had to deal with during this pandemic. We’ve been forced to change how we connect with others. We kept away from our people for months, and now that we can gather, we’re told to keep a distance, don’t touch, hug or shake hands. It feels so unnatural.

That’s the insidiousness of this virus. It’s infiltrated our world and affected the very fabric of our connectedness.

I need to make a confession – I’m incredibly sad as I write this blog. My aunt died today. She was a beloved mother, sister, grandmother, aunt and – like me – a crazy cat lady. She’s been unwell for quite some time, and I haven’t been able to see her for months. With isolation and the very real risk of spreading the virus to someone who was already so unwell, it was not a risk we could take.

And so she died, this wonderful, kind, most incredibly well-read woman. Without all of her family around her. And I’m so very sad.

I know I’m not unique in this situation. So many people have died during this pandemic – due to COVID-19 as well as the many other reasons people leave our world every single day. But sitting at home on a cold Sunday afternoon, I can’t help but reflect on how terribly sad this whole situation is.

We’ve missed, and will continue to miss, our celebrations and milestones. Weddings have been postponed. Babies have been born with far less fanfare than would normally happen. Special birthdays have been and gone without the usual fuss. Students have finished courses, aced exams or have mastered a difficult skill without the jubilant gathering of family and friends to celebrate. And funerals have occurred with only a small number of mourners allowed to attend in person.

And it’s not only the milestones and celebrations we’re missing. It’s the small events, the little encounters that go to the very heart of who we are. The big events are important, but the small things, the everyday incidental stuff with workmates, neighbours, friends, family – they’re the things that make our lives rich.

So we need to find ways to ensure our milestones, gatherings, phone calls, video chats and every day encounters carry as much joy, love, sadness, real emotion and connection as they possibly can.

Celebrate and bask in the little things. Share your day – the highs and lows with your partner/kids/closest friend – and really listen as they do the same. Take time to sit and reflect on what’s been happening in your life and those close to you. Even though it may feel like life is moving slowly at the moment, it’s moving quickly – can you believe it’s almost the end of June? – and so much can happen in a day, a week, a month. Don’t let these moments pass you by.

Tell those close to you how much they mean to you. Extend that support and kindness beyond your own bubble to those you encounter at the supermarket, when you’re driving, talking with your child’s teacher, or when you’re in a work meeting. We’re all dealing with all kinds of stuff – big and small – so let’s discard the petty annoyances and frustrations.

We’re still some way from finding a vaccine or treatment for this virus. It’s vital we continue to support and care for each other in this new normal we live in.

Life is short, and although it’s changed so dramatically, we have so much to be thankful for.

Contact our free national Help Line

If you have questions about things like COVID-19, your musculoskeletal condition, treatment options, telehealthmanaging your pain or accessing services be sure to call our nurses. They’re available weekdays between 9am-5pm on 1800 263 265; email (helpline@msk.org.au) or via Messenger.

Crisis support

If this article has raised some issues with you or you feel like you need help during this stressful time, there’s help available. Contact Lifeline Australia on 13 11 14 for 24 hour crisis support and suicide prevention. https://www.lifeline.org.au/about-lifeline/contact-us

More to explore

It’s okay to feel sad
Better Health Channel

Photo by Hello I’m Nik 🎞 on Unsplash


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13/May/2020

For most of the country it’s starting to get really chilly. And if this was a normal year, that’d be fine. Just slip on the comfy tracky dacks, jumper, thick socks…oh wait. That’s my COVID-19 working from home outfit 😂.

But seriously, it is getting quite cold. And because of iso, we’re all staying at home most of the time trying to keep warm. So how do we do this without getting an energy bill shock in the process ?😲

And although we may not be spending as much on going out, or petrol, we are paying more on other things to keep us occupied at home, or equipment and furniture to make working/schooling from home easier. All of this at a time when we’re having to make do with less work hours (or no work at all) so less income. It’s scary.

But it is getting cold and we need to stay warm. People with musculoskeletal conditions like fibromyalgia, lupus, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and back pain as well as people with Raynauds’s phenomenon, may feel the cold more keenly with increased joint and muscle pain, or lack of blood circulation to the extremities.

So what can we do to keep warm, but also keep the costs down as much as possible?

Dress for success. Let’s start with the basics. We need to dress for the temperature and wear layers of clothing. So put on the warm tracksuit pants and jumper, embrace your inner Wiggle and wear a skivvy, pull on your thick socks and tights. We need to do this when we’re indoors, and add more layers when we go outside – including hat, gloves and a scarf.

Stop up any drafts. Cover the bottom of your door with a door snake or add some door seals. Pull your curtains and blinds over the windows at night and during really miserable days to keep the warmth inside.

Turn down the temperature. While it’s tempting to crank the heat up, the most efficient temperature to set your heater to (if you can set the temp) is 18-20 degrees. While that may not sound all that warm, we’re often outside during the warmer months wearing short sleeves when the temp is 18-20 degrees. It’s just a matter of perspective.

Let the sun shine in. Open your curtains and blinds on sunny days to let the sun shine on your windows. Even if there’s a chilly wind, the sun will bring some wonderful warmth to your house. Don’t forget to close the blinds and curtains when the sun goes down

Cosy up. Snuggle up on the couch with your partner, kids, pets. And don’t forget the warm blanket or doona. Share your body heat and just enjoy being together.

Turn it off at night. You sleep better when your body has a chance to cool down a little, so turn the heater off at night. It’s also safer to sleep with the heater off. You can use a good old fashioned hot water bottle or an electric blanket to take the chill of your bed. Just don’t forget to turn your electric blanket off before you go to sleep.

Get active. Go for a brisk walk outdoors – wearing appropriate clothing – and you’ll soon warm up in no time. When you’re at home, exercise indoors using an online program, a DVD or an app. Play with the kids. Clean the house. Do anything that gets you moving and you’ll feel warmer than you would if you sit in one place for hours on end. However if you’re having a flare or you experiencing a lot of pain, be as active as you can within your limits. And use your heat packs to help relieve muscular pain.

Shorten your shower, if you can. Many of us use our shower to warm up sore joints and muscles so we can get moving. However hot water uses a lot of energy, and even a few minutes extra will add to your bill. If you’re able to, shorten the amount of time you spend in the shower, even if it’s just a little.

Move clotheshorses and other obstructions away from the heater. Apart from being a potential fire hazard, anything that blocks a heater will prevent the warm air from flowing uninterrupted. So move them away from the heat source. And to stay safe, fire authorities say you should keep clothing one metre from your heater.

Use heat packs and hot water bottles. If you’re feeling stiff and sore, heat packs or hot water bottles can help get you up and about and provide temporary pain relief. Always follow the instructions when using them including: don’t overheat them, don’t smother them under blankets or clothes, and let them cool down between use. It‘s also important to let your skin temperature return to normal before using them again. Finally it’s very easy to burn yourself using heat packs and hot water bottles, so don’t place them directly onto your skin and check their temperature before use to make sure they’re not too hot.

If you’re working from home and/or home schooling Energy.gov.au has some simple tips to reduce your energy usage.

Billing and payment help. If you’re struggling to pay your energy bills, Energy.gov.au also has some information to help you, including information about the Australian Energy Regulator’s expectations of energy companies to protect householders and small business customers during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Insulate. If your house isn’t adequately insulated, this is something you can do for long term benefit. Obviously there is a substantial upfront outlay, but it may be an option for some households.

More to explore


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13/May/2020

Thanks to one of our MSK Kids parents who has written this blog for us. They have chosen to remain anonymous. 

When our world changed rapidly at the end of March due to COVID-19 social distancing regulations and remote learning, I was amazed that my child wasn’t freaking out about all the changes taking place. I put it down to her wonderful teachers and the fact that she has dealt with a major event in her life already, a chronic health condition and immunosuppressive treatment. Here are some of the ways my child has had the dress rehearsal to COVID-19, and so have we as parents.

Experienced at social distancing

When you have an immune suppressed child you have already had to cancel play dates, sleepovers and extra-curricular activities. Your child has already stopped sport at some stage, and has probably missed important days at school or with friends. You have already been fearful of every cough and sneeze in the classroom and you know the times of the year when chicken pox cases increase.

We’ve been using hand sanitiser already

Ask any parent who has spent time with a child in hospital, and chances are they know the smell of Microshield® very well (the brand of hand sanitiser in most Australian hospitals). We’ve been used to having good hand washing habits and know the importance of alcohol-based agents to clean hands. You probably already had a decent amount of hand sanitizer at home before COVID-19, as well as alcohol-based wipes (especially if you have to administer subcutaneous injections).

We know and appreciate our healthcare workers

It didn’t take this pandemic for us to appreciate our wonderful healthcare workers. We’ve known this for years through our regular interactions with doctors, nurses and allied health workers. Hopefully everyone else now recognises the importance of good health in our lives and our amazing healthcare workers.


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22/Apr/2020

Feeling overwhelmed, exhausted, stressed and frustrated by 2020? You’re not alone! It’s been a bumpy ride so far. Filled with uncertainty, new pressures, lots of unknowns and a lack of control, many of us are feeling anxious, upset and vulnerable. When you have a musculoskeletal condition and live with regular pain and fatigue, the urge to retreat to your warm, cosy bed and pull the covers over your head can be very tempting.

But you’re strong – you’re a mighty warrior living with a chronic condition/s 🙂. You can take control of the situation and do something proactive by examining your self-care plan. Ask yourself – “is my pre-COVID self-care plan realistic now? Or does it need updating in light of the changes to my world?”

What is self-care

Self-care involves the things you deliberately do to take care of your physical, mental and emotional health and wellbeing. It’s the things you plan for (e.g. water exercise classes, visiting your specialist) and you make time for (e.g. mindfulness, taking your dog for a walk, talking with a friend).

You often see articles about self-care with pictures of day spas, yoga retreats and people exercising on the beach at sunset. All wonderful things to do to take care of your health – but when you live with a chronic condition, and you live with pain and sometimes crippling exhaustion, life’s not that glamorous.

So to create a self-care plan for yourself that’s realistic and achievable during isolation, throw those ideas out the window and let’s get real. Start by recognising and appreciating the things that you can do right now.

Some mornings it’s all you can do to get out of bed, let alone shower. So the very basics of self-care involve good quality sleep, a nutritious diet, exercise, looking after your mental health and keeping yourself and your home clean. If you have family, then you have that added responsibility as well, especially at the moment if you’re home schooling while juggling work.

So wow – that’s already a lot! So let’s break it down into bite-size chunks

Get some sleep

Easier said than done I hear you say. But getting good quality sleep is crucial for our everyday functioning. If it’s an issue for you, especially at the moment, part of your 2020 self-care plan may be to look at ways you can improve your sleep quality and quantity. We have resources to help you – including nurses you can speak to on our Help Line (see details at bottom) and info on our website. Or if it’s a problem you feel you need extra help with, talk with your doctor (in person or via a telehealth consultation) to get professional help.

Eat a healthy, nutritious diet

While it’s tempting when you’re feeling crappy to eat foods you think of as comforting (e.g chocolate, cheese, ice cream, biscuits, alcohol) you need to enjoy them in moderation. While they may make you happy for a while, it’s only temporary. Too much of a good thing can lead to weight gain and other health issues. Eating a variety of healthy foods, in a range of colours (eat the rainbow) will make you feel better overall and will give you more energy. And on the days you’re feeling great, prepare some healthy meals you can pop in the freezer for the days you’re feeling lousy.

Stay active

Exercise is so important when you have a chronic condition, but when you can no longer access your warm water exercise class or your tai chi group, finding a new exercise program can be daunting. If you’re looking online, it can sometimes be hard to judge if the exercise will help or hinder you. We’ve created some information about exercising during this time – including some tips about how you can stay active, as well as how to judge whether an online video or app is right for you. If you need some expert help and guidance, talk with your doctor about seeing an exercise physiologist, a physiotherapist or a sports and exercise physician. You can access them via a telehealth consultation or visit them in person.

Take care of your mental health

It’s really easy when you’re constantly surrounded by virus talk to become overwhelmed. Especially if you’re worried about your health, family, work and finances. And when you’re stressed and not looking after yourself properly, it can affect all aspects of your life including your family (and many of us are living in tight quarters at the moment), your ability to focus on work properly, sleep well, eat well…and so it becomes a vicious cycle.

The good news is there are lots of things you can do to look after your mental health during this time (read our blog for tips and strategies) including getting professional help if you need it. Again you can access the help you need in person or via a telehealth consultation. Talk with your doctor if you want more information about getting professional help.

But a really simple thing you can do immediately is to limit your exposure to all things COVID – pick a time when you’ll catch up on what’s happening – for example the evening news or morning bulletin – and then turn it off and tune it out.

Cleaning – plan, prioritise and pace

Cleaning – yourself, your kids, your home can be an enormous challenge. Hands up if there are days you feel like you need a nap after having a shower in the morning? It happens to most of us living with chronic pain at one time or another. For some more frequently than others. But the best thing you can do is to plan, prioritise and pace yourself.

Even before you get out of bed, while you’re lying in your cocoon, plan what you would like to do during the day. Maybe have a notepad and pen beside your bed, or use a note app on your phone and write it all down. OK, seeing it in one place, you can see that it’s a lot.

So now to the second P – prioritise. What are the things you really need to do? Do you really need to wash your hair today, or can you use the dry shampoo? Do you really need to vacuum the entire house, or just the living area? Do you really need to do 15,000 steps today, or do you need to take it down a notch. You know how you’re feeling on any given day – so plan, then prioritise.

Which then brings us to the 3rd P – pacing. Whatever you’re doing – cleaning, exercising, cooking, working, gardening, playing with the kids – pace yourself. It’s not a race – so be generous with your time, build in space for rest breaks.

And this brings us to the 4th P – peeing…after lying in bed thinking about all of this, you now need to rush to the loo 🤣

And finally, when it comes to cleaning – don’t forget hand washing. We need to do it regularly and thoroughly. We also need to be careful how we cough, sneeze and blow our noses. And avoid touching our face. Check out our hygiene 101 blog for more info.

Make time for the things you enjoy

When you’ve given the basics of your self-care plan some TLC and revised it for the current world, now take some time to consider other aspects of self-care. You may not have the time, energy or inclination to do these sorts of things most days, but schedule time to do the things that make you really happy, or relaxed, or pampered at least once a week – like a bubble bath, taking an hour to curl up with a good book, having a moment of peace and quiet in your garden to relax, doing a jigsaw puzzle, video chat with your bestie. We all need these moments to help us recharge, especially when life is so crazy and unsettled.

Contact our free national Help Line

Our nurses are available weekdays between 9am-5pm to take your calls (1800 263 265), emails (helpline@msk.org.au) or messages via Messenger. So if you have questions about things like COVID-19, your musculoskeletal condition, treatment options, telehealthmanaging your pain or accessing services – contact them today.

More to explore


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08/Apr/2020

Cast your mind back just a few short months when the thought of hanging out at home with no obligations would’ve been a wonderful dream. Relaxing, feet up on the couch, a cheeky afternoon nap…ah, the serenity. Now that we have to stay at home, we’re all finding it a little harder than we thought it would be to stay sane and entertained.

So our team have come up with a bunch of things you can do at home this Easter long weekend, and into the coming months. Apologies (sorry, not sorry) this is another long one!

Play – with your kids, pets, partner. Now’s the perfect time to let your inner child loose, play and have fun! Rediscover chasey (the dogs love that one), play hide and seek, build a blanket fort in your lounge, play footy in the backyard, play SH Health’s Easter Bingo, take part in the wheely bin challenge. 

Learn – about the world, a new skill, language, art, culture, history, society. There are so many organisations providing online learning courses, and many of them are free. Just search online using your favourite search engine, and explore what’s available. Also check out Laneway Learning, MOOCs (massive open online courses), TAFEs and colleges, community houses. You’ll come out of this pandemic with so much knowledge you’ll wow everyone at your next trivia night 🤣.

Read – OK complete disclosure here – I’m a librarian, so I love reading and want everyone to enjoy reading too 😊. Now is a great time to read that book you’ve always wanted to, or the one your friends have been going on about. You can read so many books online, or you can you can listen to audio books. Some are free, others you’ll have to pay for. Or go through the pile of books and magazines you have at home. Reread your favourites, share them with your family, create a bookclub and discuss what you loved. And don’t forget to check out your local library to access eBooks and audio books.

Travel – one of our MSK Kids families is travelling the world by having different themed dinners and dressing up. So far they’ve been to India, Malaysia, USA, Thailand 💚. You can travel online and visit cultural and historical collections around the world, zoos and galleries, explore travel blogs, watch documentaries. It’s amazing how much of the world you can experience from home.

Worship – we’re entering an important period of celebration and significance for many faiths. But we can’t gather at our churches, temples, mosques, synagogues and other places of worship with our family and friends. The good news is that a lot of them are going online. Contact your place of worship or search online to see what events are being streamed and when. Gather with your extended family and friends virtually after worship to celebrate together. It’s going to be different, and it’ll be challenging for many of us, but we can still celebrate the things that are important to us.

Create – draw, sing, paint, write, dance. Take a tip from The Sound of Music and put on a concert or puppet show. All you need to start is an idea. Then go online to see what you need (if anything) and how to move your creation forward. And don’t forget to check out Pinterest. Wow, that’s an amazing rabbit hole you’ll fall into for hours!

Donate – blood, plasma, goods, money…whatever you have to offer. As far blood and plasma go Australian Red Cross Lifeblood is still open and are a VERY essential service. So if you’ve never donated blood and/or plasma, and you’re healthy and well, they could really use yours right now. And if it’s been a while since you’ve donated, it’s time to head back there. Check out their website for more info to see if you’re eligible.

Play some more
– do a jigsaw, create a Lego masterpiece, play board games. You can do many of these things online or using an app, or brush off the games you have at the top of the cupboard in your spare room. Challenge your friends to online games like Words with Friends (if you’re a nanna like me) or some very cool multiplayer games like Fortnite. Stay connected with your friends or meet new people online and have a great time!

Connect – call your parents, your aunt, your brother, your friend from high school. Or reach out via social media. Everyone’s isolated so let’s lessen that by staying connected with the people we love, and reconnect with those we’ve lost track of.

Organise – your cupboards, garage, the weird space under the house, your finances. Wherever you have mess or chaos, what better time than now to get these things in order?

Clean – on a similar note, clean. Clean out the old things you don’t need, want or use, Save them for when you can go to the op shop and donate them. Or prepare your online ads for when you can go back to selling online*. And once you’ve sorted through this stuff, physically clean your space. Give everything a good dose of elbow grease.
*Note – we’re working under the assumption that selling your goods is not an essential reason for leaving your home (e.g. to post something or for someone to visit your house to collect something.

Camp –it’s a much loved tradition in Australia for the Easter long weekend. You can still do it, just camp in your backyard or in the lounge.

Review – your insurance, your Will, finances, energy providers and telecommunications providers. Not nearly as fun as camping 😁 but it’s important, and we never seem to have time for this kind of stuff. Until now.

Cook – we have endless online resources to help us create the perfect meal, try a new recipe, bake a cake or make chocolate crackles. Get the kids involved, make a delicious mess and have fun!

Listen – to each other, audio books, podcasts, music. Take time to really immerse yourself in whatever it is you’re listening to.

Write – a book, blog, journal, your family history. Whatever takes your fancy. Sit in front of the computer or grab a notepad and pen (or quill if you’re feeling fancy) and just get it all out. I find the best way to get started is to just do it…throw words down, have a brain dump, then reread it and edit after you’ve written something. Don’t tie yourself up in knots reading as you’re writing. You can edit when you take a break from the creative process.

Research – your family history, a place for your next holiday, info about your health condition, life, the universe and everything. By now you may have guessed that there are a lot of resources online. Try the state and national libraries, archives, commercial ancestry websites, travels sites, our website, museum websites. There’s so much information out there. The world really is your oyster when you have the time and inclination to do some online searching and exploring.

Garden – create a new garden, resurrect an old one, plant some pots, mow the lawn. Whatever you enjoy and gets you outside and into the fresh air. Then sit back and admire your handiwork. It’s such a satisfying feeling!

Meditate – with all the online stuff we’ve been suggesting, as well as all the noise of the constant media, work, school and everyone living in tight quarters at home, it can be overwhelming, exhausting and LOUD! So take some time out to be quiet. Why not try some mindfulness meditation? Or just sit quietly in your yard? Get the rest of the household involved, and make it a part of your new routine. Your mental health will thank you for these moments of stillness and reflection.

Exercise – well der. Clearly that’s a no-brainer, but it has to be included in our list. And exercise is one of the magical reasons you’re allowed to leave your home at the moment. But it does have to be in compliance with the restrictions in place in Australia, and any further restrictions in your state or territory.

Volunteer – there are many charities, community groups, schools and other organisations that depend on volunteers. And a lot of their volunteer work can be done from home. Check out what’s available by visiting the Volunteering Australia website, or contacting your school, sporting clubs and other local groups.

With all that we’ve offered here, and really it’s just the tip of the iceberg, we hope we’ve inspired you with some interesting, fun, challenging, thought-provoking things to do while in iso.

Have fun, stay safe, stay home and take care of each other.


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01/Apr/2020

Our worlds have turned upside down and inside out. Just when you think you’re getting the hang of the new normal of isolation and staying at home, a new restriction comes into place. These restrictions are vital to help prevent the spread of a highly infectious virus, but they do make it hard to find your balance.

It’s no wonder most of us are feeling anxious, stressed, upset, angry, vulnerable and a whole host of other emotions. When you also have a musculoskeletal condition, especially if you’re immunocompromised, all of these emotions may be heightened.

That’s why as well as looking after our physical health, it’s really important we look after our mental health.

We’ve put together a list of many practical things you can do to look after your mental health during the pandemic.

A quick warning, this is a ridiculously long blog 😉 but there’s so much we wanted to share with you!

Read it all, or just read the bits that are relevant to you at the moment and revisit as things change.

Find a new routine

This will obviously depend on what you need to do in your day, if you have people depending on you, if you’re working from home, have school work (or need to help others with school work) etc.

It might help to sit down with the members of your household and create a calendar that includes everyone’s commitments and needs. Things to think about when creating your calendar:

  • Get everyone involved. We’re living together in close quarters at the moment, without many of our usual distractions, sports and our friends, so it’s vital that everyone feels that their needs matter and they’re being heard.
  • Include specific time for fun stuff, exercise and connecting with family and friends. Dust off the board games – who doesn’t like a good game of Twister, Monopoly or Yahtzee?
  • Keep your weekends separate – this is really important so that you can get your chores done (sadly the laundry doesn’t stop because of a pandemic) and you have time to do creative stuff, exercise, and get a break from the workday routine.
  • Be very clear on your hours. It’s really easy to lose track of time. If you find this happening, set reminders on your phone to alert you.

Stay informed

There’s a lot of information out there about COVID-19, which can add to our anxiety and stress. But we need to stay up-to-date with factual, current information. Visit the Australian Government website for the latest from the government. Visit our website, follow us on Facebook, and/or call our Help Line weekdays on 1800 263 265 or email our nurses helpline@msk.org.au for info and support.

And once you’re up-to-date, put the news away for a while. It really doesn’t help our mental state to continually check what’s happening. Consider having a specific time (or two) when you check the latest news, and then go back to doing other things.

Get some sleep

We often struggle with sleep at the best of times, because we live with chronic pain. Unfortunately anxiety and stress can make this worse. But it’s important that we do all we can to get some decent sleep. Our physical and mental wellbeing is inextricably linked to good quality sleep – and getting enough of it. Read our recent blog for some practical tips on getting a good night’s sleep.

The Conversation has also recently written a useful article about the importance of sleep, especially now: Sleep won’t cure the coronavirus but it can help our bodies fight it.

Exercise regularly

We’ve talked, and will continue to talk about the importance of staying active – both during a pandemic (still blows my mind to say that) and during normal times. It helps us sleep better, maintain our weight, manage our pain, reduces our risks of developing other health conditions, and it improves our mood. There’s very clear evidence that regular exercise reduces stress, anxiety and feelings of depression and boosts our self-esteem. So exercise outdoors if you can (while maintaining physical distancing), and exercise in and around your home. Read our blog about exercising during the pandemic.

Eat well

Hands up who’s eating more often, and more unhealthy food choices at the moment? 🙋‍♀️🙋‍♂️ Food is a comfort to us all…and when we’re feeling a bit lost many of us reach for the food that makes us happy. But remember this gratification is short lived. Try to stick to your usual meal times, and gather everyone together and discuss your day (as long as you’re all well). If you live alone, use one of the many apps available (e.g. House Party, Hangouts) and share a virtual meal with a friend or your family.

Be careful with alcohol and other drugs

The temptation may be there to drink a little more, or use other drugs to make you feel better. But any mood changes you may experience are temporary, and drugs and alcohol have a negative effect on our mental health and our wellbeing.

Stay connected

Many of us are feeling the effects of being isolated, even if we live with others. We’re missing our circle of friends, our various social groups, our workmates and our extended families. There are many ways we can stay connected and keep up with each other’s lives. The simplest way is to pick up the phone and call. Avoid discussing the doom and gloom of the news cycle if you can. Instead focus on the new things you’re doing, your triumphs, how you’ve been able to work through challenges. And if there is something really worrying you, or making you anxious or upset, discuss it with someone you trust. Don’t ignore it. Get it out in the open so you can deal with it. As well as calling people, use tech to connect. There are a ridiculous number of ways to connect with others using social media platforms and apps. If you’re not sure where to start, read From Houseparty to Hangouts, these apps can help you stay social in coronavirus isolation by ABC News.

Create something

Channel your inner creativity. It’s a great way to relieve stress, and distract yourself from the worries of the world. There are a lot of online tutorials and info to help you: write a poem/song/novel/blog; learn a craft/language/skill; grow a flower/herb/vegie garden; paint a landscape/portrait/abstract; organise your home/office/life; cook a new recipe.

The sky really is the limit. So ask yourself – what have you always wanted to do if you just had the time??

Turn off the screens/limit news

Although a lot of the tools we’re using to deal with this pandemic are online, we need to set ourselves limits. Too much screen time, too much news – it’s just not good for us. As with everything, moderation is key. Turn off the electronics and pick up a book, or go for a walk, weed the garden, do some deep breathing exercises, talk with someone, try mindfulness. Do anything else but look at your screen or the news…at least for a while.

Give yourself a break

Our world really is crazy at the moment, so it’s important to recognise that and give yourself a break. We’ve not had to deal with a pandemic on this scale before, so be kind to yourself, and if you have a bad day, or a meltdown, that’s ok, we’ve all done it. You’ll brush yourself off and keep on going. And if you feel like you’re not finding it as easy to move on, or get past these moments, it might be time to talk with your doctor about getting professional help.

Get help when you need it

This may be psychological help if you feel like you’re not coping emotionally, financial help if you’re worried about your money situation or legal help if you have some concerns about your employment rights, or you have questions about writing your Will or setting up Powers of Attorney. Getting expert advice can help relieve some anxiety.

Take heart

🧡We’ll get through this. We may have to change and adapt, but we will come out on the other side of this pandemic. We just have to be patient, follow the advice and guidance of our health professionals and the government, look after each other and be creative with how we live during these crazy times.

More to explore


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13/Mar/2020

Having children, self-belief and acceptance

Written by Shirani Wright

Read part 1 of Shirani’s story.

Another thing that was very hard for me – and I’m sure turned out much better than the doctors thought – was having my children. I don’t think my rheumatologist was overly keen on the idea, but he knew me well enough, not to try and talk me about of it as he knew that nothing was going to stop me and nothing did!

I was advised that I had to come off my methotrexate for three months before we started trying to get pregnant. This is because it’s a category X drug for pregnancy and can cause serious birth defects, including spina bifida. This was a bit scary.

The doctors thought that, by coming off methotrexate, I might have a big flare-up and not be able to even get pregnant. I came off methotrexate and luckily for me, no flare-up. They also thought if I did get pregnant there were a lot of other possible complications that could have resulted in the baby being born early.

My doctors pretty much implied I was too sick to get pregnant and carry to full term. Well, you know what they could do with that idea!! Even if I had to sit in bed for nine months and not move, I was determined to have children and that’s what I did. I have two beautiful girls, Chloe and Jacinta. I’m not going to say it was always easy, but it was worth it. I feel extremely luckily to have my two healthy girls.

I’d like the all the parents of kids with arthritis, and children with arthritis, to know it’s possible to have children of your own if you want to, even if you do have arthritis.

Having arthritis does make looking after my girls difficult sometimes, but I wouldn’t have it any other way. I wasn’t about to let arthritis stop me from having children!!! It’s easier, now they are both at school. I’m also very lucky to have a very supportive husband who understands my health issues and does a lot with the children as well as working full time and supporting me emotionally.

I also get emotional support from my friends, and family, but I’ve found that the Young Women’s Arthritis Support Group has helped greatly, as everyone in the group knows what it’s like to be in pain, be on medication, have bad days and everything that goes along with having a chronic illness.

I believe having arthritis has made me a strong person mentally and that it has helped me develop a positive attitude towards life. It often hasn’t been easy but I’m not one to back down from a challenge. I sometimes wonder what I’d be like as a person if I didn’t have arthritis.

We all have our limitations whether we have a disability or not. There are those who might not be able to walk but they might be a terrific artist. People with a disability can have just as fulfilling a life as someone without one. We can do anything we set our mind to. It might just take a bit of extra work but we can do it.

If I can give any advice to children with arthritis I would say, we need to believe in ourselves. We need to accept that we have a disability and that we have limitations but we shouldn’t let our disability define who we are. We are more than our disability.

To leave you, I’ll finish with a thought. Never give up and always shoot for your dreams!


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12/Mar/2020

Growing up, school and working

Written by Shirani Wright

I wake up in the early morning to go to the toilet. I look at the time – 5.00am – early enough to take my tablets. I turn on the lamp and automatically reach over and take my prednisolone, plus eight other tablets so they have time to work before I need to get up and get my girls ready for school. I go back to sleep until my alarm goes off at 6.50am and then I start my day.

Taking medication is a part of my life as I have systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. I was three and a half when it all began.

It started when I got bronchitis. My condition worsened and I was in hospital for six weeks. No one knew what was wrong with me. The doctors thought I had pneumonia, and although I was on IV antibiotics I just wasn’t getting better.

I was transferred to The Royal Children’s Hospital, where I had a number of investigations on my lungs and they discovered that I had a massive amount of inflammation. With this discovery and further tests, I finally had a diagnosis – systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis or SJIA, an autoimmune condition that has stayed with me to this day. Not many people know that lung involvement, like I had, can be a part of some types of arthritis. And for me, joint involvement happened a bit later.

Since I was diagnosed at 3, I don’t remember not having arthritis. I think maybe this has made it easier for me than other people I’ve met who got arthritis at an older age, who might have been used to a certain life. I don’t remember what it’s like not to be in pain or discomfort every day or not to regularly go to the doctors, have tests, and be in hospital. It’s all just a part of my life and I’ve accepted it.

My twin sister and I had tennis lessons for a while but I remember I couldn’t run fast enough. I also did gymnastics too, so as you can see I didn’t let my arthritis stop me! My sister played basketball with a school friend for a time, I didn’t because of my arthritis. I don’t remember being particularly upset by this. I used to go and watch her team play and sometimes score for them.

At school, my arthritis didn’t affect me that much. I pretty much always joined in with PE unless I was having a particularly bad day. Sometimes if we had to walk somewhere from school my mum would organise for me to get driven by one of the teachers and I could always take a friend. Sometimes I’d be late getting to school if I was waiting for my tablets to work.

I felt like I had a bit of support from Musculoskeletal Australia growing up but not as much as there is available now. The Arthritis Foundation of Victoria (as it was known back then) ran camps during the summer holidays as a way for young people with arthritis to get together, meet each other etc. On these camps, they offered workshops run by doctors, massages and free time. It also gave us the chance to meet other young people with arthritis.

Up until those camps, I think I had only met one other child with arthritis; that’s why I think MSK Kids is a really great idea. It gives kids and young people an opportunity to meet each other and support each other. It also gives their parents the same thing. I’m sure my parents would have liked to have known some parents of kids with arthritis.

One thing I didn’t like about having to take medication for my arthritis is that because I’ve taken prednisolone since I was 3 (and I’m still on it 41 years later) it has stunted my growth. So when I was 15 years old, I looked 10 or younger, and that really used to bug me! I remember once I was in a shop with my mum and the shop assistant said, “are you mum’s little helper” and I got really upset. As my mum said though, it’s not her fault she doesn’t know. Now that I’m an adult, being short doesn’t worry me really from a social point of view, it’s more on a practical side when I sometimes have trouble reaching things at the supermarket, or glasses on shelves etc.

I think one thing that got me through childhood with arthritis,(apart from my mum)
is a positive attitude. Because I have arthritis there are things I can’t do. However, I try to concentrate on what I can do rather than what I can’t. This isn’t always easy, but I try and take the attitude that there’s no use worrying about what I can’t do, as that won’t change the situation. I try not to get grumpy or sad about it as this doesn’t change anything. It just gets me down and isn’t much fun for the people around me.

It’s not always easy to accept my limitations but I try and think “well everyone, including healthy people, has limitations”. Not everyone can run a marathon but does that mean they’re not as good as someone who can? I would say NO. Those people who can’t do one thing might be able to do something that another person can’t do. A fish can’t walk, but they’re happy.

One limitation I have had to deal with because of my arthritis is that I’m not working.

I left school and went to university and then TAFE. I worked in several part-time jobs over 10 years. I had to change fields of jobs from Nanning to reception/admin work as nannying was too physical. I did try working full-time for a year and a half but ended up in hospital as I often became breathless (which happens a lot with my type of arthritis).

At that stage, my doctor said I needed to cut my hours back. I found this hard as up until then my arthritis had not really limited me in a big way. But the fact that I couldn’t work full time was a big thing. It made me feel like I was sick and not normal.

One of my friends didn’t understand this. She said it was good that I only had to work part-time. What she didn’t understand was that working part-time wasn’t a choice! I didn’t choose it, I had to do it for health reasons. After some time and thought, I accepted this change and continued with my life. I no longer do any paid work as my health isn’t up to it.

Read part 2 of Shirani’s story.


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22/Jan/2020

Written by Steve Edwards

“A cortisone injection? You want to stick a needle in my sore foot?”

Your health care clinician has suggested you have a cortisone injection into your foot. As with any medical procedure, both of you are best advised to discuss the benefits and risks before proceeding. It helps to know what cortisone is, what it does, and why it’s been offered to you.

Cortisone is an anti-inflammatory medication that’s often used to treat musculoskeletal conditions. It’s a synthetic version of cortisol, a hormone that naturally occurs in your body. Injected into the affected area, cortisone can lower inflammation and pain, remove fluid, and thin scar tissue or adhesions. So if your clinician diagnoses a musculoskeletal condition affecting your foot or ankle – such as arthritis, bursitis, neuroma, or tendinitis – a cortisone injection is commonly raised as an effective treatment option.

Cortisone injections also contain a local anaesthetic. For certain conditions an injection can be painful, so the anaesthetic may be injected separately before the cortisone to block this pain.

The clinician may or may not use ultrasound technology to guide the injection. For pain relief in the foot or ankle, research finds no statistically-significant difference between procedures conducted with or without ultrasound. Interestingly, trials on cadavers injected with dyed cortisone show how it rapidly spreads from the injection-point to adjacent tissue, indicating that pinpoint accuracy is not key to effectiveness.

There are several types of cortisone. In most cases the clinician will administer a long-duration cortisone, taking effect within 1-3 weeks, with benefits lasting between 1-9 months, depending on the condition and its severity. There’s a clinical consensus that no more than 3 injections should be administered to the same body-part within a 12-month period, though there’s no research literature to clearly support this belief.

After the injection, you can quickly return to most activities. The clinician may recommend you avoid strenuous physical exertion such as gym workouts or running for a few days, so the cortisone isn’t displaced from the target tissue.

As for risk-factors, there’s been research into whether the injection may risk tearing tendons in the target area. There’s no recorded case of this in human trials, though it has occurred in trials on dogs and horses. There were cases of more general tissue damage recorded in early trials on American gridiron players, but various factors could have produced this result – the needle used, the amount of fluid injected, and the subjects receiving multiple injections within a short period.

No medical procedure has a 100-percent success rate, but a single cortisone injection administered by a trained clinician is both safe and effective in providing medium-term pain relief. Side effects are minimal, and the benefit to your musculoskeletal condition is potentially vast. And for some foot-specific conditions – such as a neuroma (pinched nerve), or plantar fasciitis (heel pain due to scar tissue) – a cortisone injection can often be a cure.

Our guest blogger

Steven Edwards is a trainee foot and ankle surgeon with the Australasian College of Podiatric Surgeons. He also teaches pharmacology and foot surgery to undergraduate podiatry students at La Trobe University.




Musculoskeletal Australia (or MSK) is the consumer organisation working with, and advocating on behalf of, people with arthritis, osteoporosis, back pain, gout and over 150 other musculoskeletal conditions.

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