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11/Jun/2020

Sore neck? Back? Knees? Feel like you’ve aged 20 years with all the niggles, twinges and outright pain you’re feeling lately? You’re not alone. Many of us, even those who don’t live with a musculoskeletal condition, are feeling the physical effects of months of isolation, changes to our routine and living more sedentary lives than usual.

There are many reasons for this, and the good news is there’s lots you can do to deal with these annoying aches and pains.

Working or studying from home

When many of us first started working from home, it felt strange but also pretty cool. No dreaded peak hour commute. Yay! Instead we moved a bit more leisurely, lingered over coffee and our slippers stayed on all day. But after months of sitting at makeshift desks, or using laptops for hours on end, or struggling with tech issues and video calls, the cool phase is well and truly gone.

You may notice that you’re getting a sore neck more often, or your back aches, or you’re really tight across your shoulder blades. Or when you stand up your knees and/or hips let you know quite emphatically that you’ve been sitting in one place for a loooong time.

The problem is most of us don’t have a dedicated working space that’s set up as well as the one we had in the office. And since we’re likely to be working from home for quite some time, we need to deal with these issues rather than continuing to put up with them and the resulting aches and pains. Some simple things you can do include:

  • Have a routine – and stick to it. Find what works best for you and your specific situation. Whether you’re home schooling your kids, sharing your work space and equipment with your partner, or keeping your pets off your laptop, all of these things will factor into your routine. For me, internet access is really poor during the late afternoon, so starting work earlier and finishing earlier meant I could work more productively and with much less frustration. We’ll all have different solutions to suit our unique situations. So work out what’s best for you and stick with it. And don’t forget to talk with your employer if your new routine affects how/when you work.
  • Check out your work space. Is it helping or hindering you? Are you putting up with an uncomfortable space because you’re not sure what else to do? If so Safe Work Australia has a guide to help you set up your workstation and ABC News also has some practical hacks to take some of the pain out of working from home.
  • Move. When you’re working from home it’s easy for time to get away from you. We don’t have our usual cues to move such as getting up to go to the copier or attending a meeting in another room or just going to chat with a workmate. We’re sitting more and moving less. So you need to schedule time to get up, move around, stretch, go outside. Set up regular alerts on your phone/computer/watch – whatever works for you – and make sure you move. You’ll really notice a big difference at the end of your day.
  • Talk with your employer. If you need to adjust your hours, or you’re having issues with equipment or tech, or you’re having other issues working from home, discuss this with your manager or with HR. Together you should be able to come up with some solutions to ease these issues.

Managing stress

We’re living through a worldwide pandemic. Even after several months it feels surreal to say that. It’s important to acknowledge that it’s a really stressful time. Apart from worrying about getting sick, we’re also stressed about work, making sure the kids don’t fall behind at school, managing our chronic conditions, our finances, our family, and concern about the future. Add in the current unrest across the globe and it’s amazing we’re not all hiding under the bed.

But stress can cause physical aches and pains. It can also affect the quality of our sleep, our pain levels and can trigger a flare. So it’s important we find ways to manage stress effectively.

Many of the practical strategies we use to manage pain can be used to manage stress. These include: deep breathing, exercising, pacing, talking with a friend, mindfulness, guided imagery, progressive muscle relaxation and doing something you enjoy (e.g. reading, gardening, walking your dog, playing music).

But if you’re finding it difficult to manage your stress, talk with a professional such as your doctor or psychologist. There’s help available. And remember you can access them via telehealth if you prefer.

Spending more time at home

Even though isolation is easing we’re still meant to stay at home as much as we can. And with the weather getting really chilly, we’re getting cosy on the couch with the doona and the remote, as we binge lots of TV (or is that just me 😂). There’s just so much to watch!

Hanging out on the couch and binge watching TV is ok occasionally, but we don’t want to get into the habit of doing it too often. Slouching on the couch and not moving for long periods can aggravate our existing musculoskeletal conditions. And if we’re not moving and being active regularly it can also make it difficult to manage our weight.

So make sure you get up and move. Take a break. Go for a walk or do some exercises or stretches.

Break up your day with a mix of activities – both physically active (e.g. walking, gardening, tidying) and more passive (e.g. reading, watching TV, sitting at a computer).

Be aware of your posture

Bad posture can sneak up on us. Working at a computer, sitting on the couch reading a book, standing around watching the kids in the playground, lifting shopping out of the boot of your car – if you’re not paying attention to your posture, it’s easy to slouch, hunch over or strain.

As I’m typing this I’m literally straightening up from the curled position I was in, hunched over my laptop. And wow – it feels amazing when you sit up straight. It’s the same when you’ve been sitting on the couch for a while – when you stand up, stretching feels soooo good.

So be aware of your posture as you’re sitting and standing. For more info read our tips for good posture.

Increase your incidental exercise

Because we’re more sedentary than usual, and don’t have many of our usual outlets for exercise, we need to find ways to become more active. Increasing our incidental exercise is one way to do this. Incidental exercise is the little bits and pieces you do over the course of your day such as walking to a letterbox to post a letter, playing with the grandkids, cleaning the house. It’s not a part of your structured exercise plan, but it is important. There are many ways you can increase your incidental exercise without too much effort or disruption to your day. Read our blog to find out more. Before you know it you’ll be feeling more energised and noticing a difference with your pain levels, sleep quality and mood.

Dress appropriately

It’s getting really cold and many of us are a little stressed at the thought of high energy bills as we stay home and use the heater more. It’s tempting to keep the heat down, but that can cause your muscles to become tense, aggravating your musculoskeletal condition. So it’s important to keep warm. One of the simplest things you can do to stay warm is to dress for the weather. Let’s face it we’re not going anywhere, so wear the thick socks, the cuddly jumper and the daggiest track pants. Whatever keeps you warm.

We also need to be mindful of our footwear. Although it’s tempting to stay in our slippers all day, our feet and ankles need proper support. Wear the right footwear for whatever you’re doing. Going for a walk? Put on your sneakers. Working at home? Wear your casual shoes/boots that support your feet and keep you warm. And lounging around in the evening? Get those slippers on.

Be careful of trips and falls

Hands up if you’ve tripped over cables, laptop bags, files, excited dogs, folders, exercise equipment, books, and other stuff that’s suddenly cluttering your home? With all of the other things going on at home at the moment, school, work, exercise, entertainment…we’ve had to make space for all sorts of things in order to be get by. Which means our risk of tripping or falling has suddenly increased, especially if you’ve got nowhere to put these things and they’re constantly in the living area. So be careful as you move around your home – don’t rush, put things away if you can and tie or tape down cables. Preventing a fall, especially if you have a musculoskeletal condition, is easier than dealing with the significant injuries a fall can cause. So please be careful.

Treating pain

Even when you’ve done everything you can to prevent joint pain and muscle strain, you may still find you’re a bit sore. Depending on how severe this pain is, you may be able to treat it simply with heat and cold, massage, short term use of medication, distraction and many other strategies. Check out our A-Z guide for managing pain for more hints and tips.
However if the pain is severe, it’s affecting your day to day activities, your ability to sleep, or it’s lasted for some time with no relief, it’s a good idea to talk with your doctor about it. Together you can find out what’s causing the pain, and the most effective ways to treat it. Don’t simply put up with it.

Contact our free national Help Line

If you have questions about things like COVID-19, your musculoskeletal condition, treatment options, telehealthmanaging your pain or accessing services be sure to call our nurses. They’re available weekdays between 9am-5pm on 1800 263 265; email (helpline@msk.org.au) or via Messenger.


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28/May/2020

It’s a good thing iso is starting to ease around the country. Did you know people have been injuring themselves with all this time at home? Who knew taking time to get fit, being creative with exercise or tackling some of the DIY jobs around the house could be so dangerous?😮

So here are some tips to help you stay safe at home:

Exercise

We’ll soon be able to go back to our gyms, pools and fitness centres – but the number of people who can be in these spaces at one time will be strictly limited. So you’ll probably still have to make do with home exercise. To keep safe we suggest you:

  • talk with your doctor, exercise physiologist or physiotherapist – in person or via telehealth – if you’re concerned that you’re feeling more pain than usual when exercising or after exercising. They can also tailor a home exercise program to suit your specific needs and health conditions.
  • book an appointment to talk with an instructor at your fitness centre. They can run through your exercises and give you feedback about your exercise technique.
  • before using online exercise videos, classes or apps, check the qualifications of the instructor. Do they have the expertise to provide these exercises safely? And for people with musculoskeletal conditions? Read our blog about evaluating online exercise.
  • warm up before you exercise, and cool down when you finish. Many of us skip this because we don’t feel like we have the time or just can’t be bothered. But it’s an important part of exercising and may help reduce injury. Warming up increases blood flow to the muscles and gives you the chance to get in the right headspace for exercise. Cooling down helps your body return to the resting state it was in before you started, allowing your heart rate to lower and your body to cool down.
  • don’t push yourself too far too quickly. Many of us saw iso as a chance to jump in and get fit. Yay – all this time to exercise, nothing can stop us. Until you hurt yourself or do too much 😪 That’s why it’s important to build up slowly and progress over time. But you do need to challenge yourself, so ensure that your exercise gets more difficult over time.
  • if your joint/s feel particularly painful after exercising (for longer than two hours after an exercise session), reduce the intensity of your next session. And if an activity causes you pain or increases your pain beyond what’s normal for you, then stop this activity. Get advice from a professional to ensure you’re doing the exercise correctly or to modify it for you.

Cycling

Wow that’s really taken off! And it’s great to see so many people and families out cycling together. But if you’re not used to riding a bike regularly you can get hurt. So:

  • be realistic. We’ve all heard the saying “it’s just like riding a bike” so we assume it’s simple, but if you’re not riding regularly, start small. It’s easy when you have the wind in your hair and the sun on your face to just ride and ride and ride. But remember, you need to return to where you started. So plan a bike route that’s easy, flat and achievable. You can increase this over time.
  • make sure you have all the right bits and pieces to keep you and others (like pedestrians) safe. So wear a helmet, use your bell when approaching others and have a light fitted just in case you get caught out when the light begins to fade. And wear comfortable, high visibility clothes so you can be seen.
  • use a bike path if there’s one nearby. Especially if you’re starting out or fairly new to riding. Riding in traffic can be scary and intimidating, and if you’re not confident it can be dangerous. So build up your confidence on bike paths.
  • read our blog for more tips about riding a bike.

DIY

Like getting fit, iso was going to be a time when we got all those odd jobs and repairs done around the home. But this has seen people falling off ladders and injuring themselves with power tool – yikes. So before you tackle that DIY job:

  • ask yourself – does it require a professional? There are some jobs – like electrical work and larger plumbing repairs or installations – that should only be done by someone with the necessary skills and qualifications.
  • do a risk assessment. Most of the time we just want to get the job done – the gutter unclogged, the new towel rail hung. But are there any risks involved? Do you have the right tools and equipment? Do you know if there are electrical cables behind the wall? You don’t need to write up a full risk assessment report, but just take some time before you get started to make sure you have everything you need to proceed safely.
  • be careful if you use a ladder. This is one of the biggest hazards for the DIYer – falling from a ladder or stepladder. And you can really hurt yourself. So if you’re using one, make sure you have someone around to help you move it and to ensure you’re safe. Move the ladder when you need to – don’t lean over or stretch to reach something – that’s when you can overbalance and fall.
  • whatever DIY job you’re doing – dress for it. Wear suitable clothing, footwear, gloves, and a mask if there’ll be dust or fumes.
  • don’t do anything if you’re not 100% – so if you’re tired, you’ve been drinking or you’re affected by drugs (including prescription meds) – don’t do anything. The job will still be there tomorrow.

Mental health

As well as physical injuries we may have suffered during this time, our mental health may have also taken a hit. There’s been a rise in the number of people experiencing anxiety and depression from being cooped up in iso and the loss of normal life and routines. And there’s also the stresses of working and schooling from home, financial pressure and general worry about the future. These issues are no less serious than falling from a ladder or stacking your bike, so if you’re struggling talk with someone. Whether it’s your partner, family member, a close friend or a professional, talk with someone. Don’t ignore these feelings. There’s a lot of help available.

Get help

Finally, if you do hurt yourself seek medical advice. Many people are putting off going to see their doctor or the emergency department for fear of COVID-19. However medical facilities have measures in place to keep the general public and their staff as safe as possible. So if you injure yourself, don’t ignore it or soldier on – make an appointment to see your doctor, or if it’s serious go to the emergency department or call an ambulance.

Contact our free national Help Line

If you have questions about things like COVID-19, your musculoskeletal condition, treatment options, telehealthmanaging your pain or accessing services be sure to call our nurses. They’re available weekdays between 9am-5pm on 1800 263 265; email (helpline@msk.org.au) or via Messenger.

More to explore

Check out some of our health articles and blogs for more info.


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21/May/2020

For many of us our pain is always there – sometimes in the background and at other times it’s very much in the front of our minds. It’s a constant – just like taxes 😒 Even with a pandemic causing so much chaos and uncertainty, our pain persists, it’s always there.

And quite frankly it’s a pain in the arse. It hurts. It’s exhausting. And it’s invisible.

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare last week released their latest report Chronic pain in Australia. It highlights that 1 in 5 of us lives with chronic pain. So next time you’re standing in a physically distant queue at the shops or taking a walk around the park – consider the fact that 1 in 5 of the people see you around you is also living with pain. It’s a massive problem, but there are things we can all do to manage our pain effectively.

Know your pain and yourself

It’s so important when you live with a chronic condition that you understand it. Learn as much about your condition as you can so that you can take an active role in managing it, including the pain associated with it. For example, what makes your pain better? What makes it worse? Do you tend to overdo things when you’re feeling great and end up paying for it over the next couple of days with increased pain? Or when you’re experiencing a flare and your pain is worse – do you get anxious, and everything becomes negative and too hard?

Knowing these things – really understanding how your pain affects you physically, emotionally and behaviourally – will help you manage your pain and your condition better, even in this time of crazy COVID.

Tackle the big three – exercise, eat, sleep, repeat

I don’t know about you, but I’m finding my exercise, diet and sleep have all taken a hit due to the pandemic and iso. Not being able to get to the gym, changes to work and my normal routine and stress has really impacted how and when I’m eating, sleeping and exercising. And not in a positive way.

This has had a very noticeable effect on my pain levels. If you’re experiencing this too, acknowledging it is the first step to changing things. So I can’t get to the gym – there are other ways to be active. So my routine has changed and as a result so has my diet. I can manage that. Stress and pain is impacting my sleep? I’ve managed that before – I can do it again.

It’s all about finding the right mindset. This is a strange, new normal we’re living in. And it’s going to change and evolve as we continue through 2020. We have no roadmap for what’s been, and what’s to come – so we need to do the best we can to change and adapt to the constantly shifting landscape.

Get help

OK, that all sounded sooooo easy, right?? Nope.

We may be able to change and adapt to some things but there will be times when we need to ask for help. From our family and friends, from our doctor, physio, psychologist. Whether it’s medications or physiotherapy to directly manage the pain, or asking a family member to carry the heavy laundry basket to the clothesline, or talking with a friend about your frustrations – whatever it is, there’s help available. You just need to acknowledge the fact that you need it and reach out. And remember the nurses on our Help Line are just a call or email away.

Use your mind

It’s a powerful tool. You can use it for distraction, mindfulness, relaxation, visualisation and guided imagery. None of these things will take your pain away completely, but they can provide temporary relief while you do a painful task, try to fall asleep, or wait for your pain medication to kick in.

‘P’ yourself – plan, prioritise and pace

We’re often our own worst enemy. We do too much when we’re feeling great, and end up feeling rubbish for hours/days afterwards. Something ‘simple’ we can do to prevent this from happening time and again is to plan, prioritise and pace ourselves. First plan – what do you need to do today? Write it down. Now prioritise. How much of those zillion things do you really need to do? Often things we see as hugely important aren’t. And do you need to do them yourself? Can someone else do it? Now pace yourself. It’s not a race – so be generous with your time, spread your jobs over the day and build in space for rest breaks.

Look after your mental health

Living with persistent pain can sometimes be a roller-coaster of emotions. It’s perfectly natural that from time to time to feel sad, worried, angry, anxious, depressed or frustrated. Add a pandemic, and it’s no wonder many of us are feeling as if our worlds have turned upside down and inside out. It’s important that you acknowledge these feelings. You may want to write in a journal, talk with a family member or close friend or talk with a counsellor or psychologist. Don’t ignore these feelings or keep them bottled up.

Your GP can refer you to a psychologist if needed on a GP Mental Health Management Plan. At the moment because of COVID-19 you can arrange to speak to a psychologist via telehealth (over the phone or a video call).

Be kind

To yourself and to others. It’s an unprecedented, really strange time and we’re all doing the best we can. So be kind to yourself – you’ll experience ups and downs, stumbling blocks, and barriers that get in your way. And some days you’ll need to work really hard just to keep moving. So give yourself a break. And remember 1 in 5 people are living with invisible chronic pain. And even more people are dealing with all kinds of stuff we can’t even imagine. So be kind to the people you encounter. It makes us all feel so much better than the alternative.

More to explore

Our nurse Clare discusses some simple things you can do to manage pain while at home in isolation, including pacing activities, exercise, getting a good night’s sleep and heat and cold packs.

We also have some great blogs to give you more tips and info about managing pain:


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13/May/2020

For most of the country it’s starting to get really chilly. And if this was a normal year, that’d be fine. Just slip on the comfy tracky dacks, jumper, thick socks…oh wait. That’s my COVID-19 working from home outfit 😂.

But seriously, it is getting quite cold. And because of iso, we’re all staying at home most of the time trying to keep warm. So how do we do this without getting an energy bill shock in the process ?😲

And although we may not be spending as much on going out, or petrol, we are paying more on other things to keep us occupied at home, or equipment and furniture to make working/schooling from home easier. All of this at a time when we’re having to make do with less work hours (or no work at all) so less income. It’s scary.

But it is getting cold and we need to stay warm. People with musculoskeletal conditions like fibromyalgia, lupus, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and back pain as well as people with Raynauds’s phenomenon, may feel the cold more keenly with increased joint and muscle pain, or lack of blood circulation to the extremities.

So what can we do to keep warm, but also keep the costs down as much as possible?

Dress for success. Let’s start with the basics. We need to dress for the temperature and wear layers of clothing. So put on the warm tracksuit pants and jumper, embrace your inner Wiggle and wear a skivvy, pull on your thick socks and tights. We need to do this when we’re indoors, and add more layers when we go outside – including hat, gloves and a scarf.

Stop up any drafts. Cover the bottom of your door with a door snake or add some door seals. Pull your curtains and blinds over the windows at night and during really miserable days to keep the warmth inside.

Turn down the temperature. While it’s tempting to crank the heat up, the most efficient temperature to set your heater to (if you can set the temp) is 18-20 degrees. While that may not sound all that warm, we’re often outside during the warmer months wearing short sleeves when the temp is 18-20 degrees. It’s just a matter of perspective.

Let the sun shine in. Open your curtains and blinds on sunny days to let the sun shine on your windows. Even if there’s a chilly wind, the sun will bring some wonderful warmth to your house. Don’t forget to close the blinds and curtains when the sun goes down

Cosy up. Snuggle up on the couch with your partner, kids, pets. And don’t forget the warm blanket or doona. Share your body heat and just enjoy being together.

Turn it off at night. You sleep better when your body has a chance to cool down a little, so turn the heater off at night. It’s also safer to sleep with the heater off. You can use a good old fashioned hot water bottle or an electric blanket to take the chill of your bed. Just don’t forget to turn your electric blanket off before you go to sleep.

Get active. Go for a brisk walk outdoors – wearing appropriate clothing – and you’ll soon warm up in no time. When you’re at home, exercise indoors using an online program, a DVD or an app. Play with the kids. Clean the house. Do anything that gets you moving and you’ll feel warmer than you would if you sit in one place for hours on end. However if you’re having a flare or you experiencing a lot of pain, be as active as you can within your limits. And use your heat packs to help relieve muscular pain.

Shorten your shower, if you can. Many of us use our shower to warm up sore joints and muscles so we can get moving. However hot water uses a lot of energy, and even a few minutes extra will add to your bill. If you’re able to, shorten the amount of time you spend in the shower, even if it’s just a little.

Move clotheshorses and other obstructions away from the heater. Apart from being a potential fire hazard, anything that blocks a heater will prevent the warm air from flowing uninterrupted. So move them away from the heat source. And to stay safe, fire authorities say you should keep clothing one metre from your heater.

Use heat packs and hot water bottles. If you’re feeling stiff and sore, heat packs or hot water bottles can help get you up and about and provide temporary pain relief. Always follow the instructions when using them including: don’t overheat them, don’t smother them under blankets or clothes, and let them cool down between use. It‘s also important to let your skin temperature return to normal before using them again. Finally it’s very easy to burn yourself using heat packs and hot water bottles, so don’t place them directly onto your skin and check their temperature before use to make sure they’re not too hot.

If you’re working from home and/or home schooling Energy.gov.au has some simple tips to reduce your energy usage.

Billing and payment help. If you’re struggling to pay your energy bills, Energy.gov.au also has some information to help you, including information about the Australian Energy Regulator’s expectations of energy companies to protect householders and small business customers during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Insulate. If your house isn’t adequately insulated, this is something you can do for long term benefit. Obviously there is a substantial upfront outlay, but it may be an option for some households.

More to explore


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07/May/2020

Hands up if you’re feeling tired at the moment? Or if you’re too weary to raise your hand, just a brief nod will do it 😉 It seems like we’re a nation of tired people at the moment (😪).

Why is this? We’re not going out like we used to, to the movies, restaurants, family gatherings, to see friends, sports events, or take the kids to all of their extra-curricular activities. We should be swimming in time and feeling relaxed and rested, right?

Ah, no.

We’re stressed

Stop me if you’ve heard this before but we’re going through unprecedented times. This pandemic is causing massive disruptions to our lives, our families, our work and our routines. This constant uncertainty causes us to feel stressed. All the time.

When we’re stressed our bodies release adrenaline. It’s so we can react to a crisis, the old ’fight or flight’ response. But when the stress is constant, as many of us are feeling at the moment, this has an effect on our health – including making us feel physically and mentally tired.

There are lots of things you can do to manage stress. By understanding what’s causing your stress, you can start to manage it. This may include things like developing a new routine (and sticking to it), exercising, talking with your family about how you’re feeling, finding ways to relax, making sure you’re eating a healthy diet and drinking enough water, getting a good night’s sleep and avoiding excessive use of alcohol and other drugs.

We’re staying indoors more

Because of restrictions we’re staying inside our homes more. So we’re not getting exposed to as much sunlight as we normally would. A lack of sunlight causes the brain to produce more of the hormone melatonin, which makes us sleepy.

To deal with this, schedule time every day to go outside for a walk or stroll in your yard, open your blinds or curtains as soon as you get up and expose yourself to as much sunlight as you can. It’ll help you feel more awake and improve your mood. Just think how much better you feel after being stuck indoors when you get out into the sun. It makes you feel so much more energetic and alive! So this one’s a no brainer. We just have to make time to do it.

We’re sleeping less (or more) than usual

Let’s face it, since this all started our usual everyday routines have been shot to pieces. Work, home life, family, socialising, shopping – it’s all so different at the moment. When you add stress to the mix, our sleep is often affected.

You may find you’re sleeping less than usual because you’re working long hours to catch up on work after spending the day home schooling the kids, or you’re watching more TV and spending more hours online, or stress is causing you to feel more pain and you’re having issues sleeping through the night.

Or you may be sleeping more – trying to rid yourself of this constant feeling of tiredness, or because you’re bored, or because it’s cold outside and you’re feeling cosy and warm indoors, or because you’re feeling sad. Not enough sleep, too much sleep and poor quality sleep will all increase how tired you feel.

That’s why it’s important that you stick to a sleep schedule – even on the weekends. Get out of bed in the morning and go to bed at night, at the same time every day. Your body needs this regularity for your internal clock to function properly, and to help you fall asleep and wake up more easily and feeling more refreshed.

And if you’re regularly finding it difficult to sleep or get out of bed because you’re feeling really sad or down, it’s a really good idea to talk with someone about this, whether it’s family, a close friend or your doctor. Please don’t ignore this.

We’re exercising less

Many of us are finding we’re exercising less because we don’t have access to our warm water exercise classes, tai chi, gyms and exercise groups. Not getting enough exercise can make you feel sluggish and tired. If this continues for some time, we start to get out of shape and feel less inclined to exercise. So it’s really important to make exercise – whether it’s online videos and apps, walking, dusting off your old exercise DVDs, or dancing around the living room – an essential part of your everyday routine. And get the family involved. Everyone needs to be exercising and staying active for our physical and mental wellbeing. If you’re home alone, use a video app to call a friend and exercise together. You’ll find you’ll feel more energised and happier when you’re exercising regularly.

We live with chronic conditions

Apart from all of above affecting how tired we’re feeling, we live with chronic musculoskeletal conditions and other health issues. These often cause us to feel fatigued. Many of our medications and living with chronic pain can also make us feel excessively tired. When you add a pandemic on top of that, the unique issues you’re facing – how the virus may affect you, worry about being more at risk, how to safely access your healthcare team, navigating telehealth – it can heighten you’re feelings of fatigue.

Many of the things we’ve looked at – such as establishing a routine, getting adequate sleep, eating well, exercising and staying connected with your family, friends and work colleagues will help you with some of these issues.

You can also get help from your GP and from the nurses on our Help Line. Contact a peer support group or go online and connect with others dealing with similar things. Even just talking with others who know exactly how you’re feeling can help you feel less isolated.

We may need to talk with our doctor

Finally if you’re concerned that your tiredness is due to more than just the reasons listed above, it might be worth talking with your doctor about it. Your tiredness may be caused by other things like vitamin deficiency (for example iron and vitamin D), side effects of your medications, feeling sad, anxious or depressed or it may indicate another health issue. So make an appointment to discuss it with your doctor – either in person or via a telehealth consultation.

Contact our free national Help Line

If you have questions about things like COVID-19, your musculoskeletal condition, treatment options, telehealthmanaging your pain or accessing services be sure to call our nurses. They’re available weekdays between 9am-5pm on 1800 263 265; email (helpline@msk.org.au) or via Messenger.

More to explore

Photo by Tracey Hocking on Unsplash


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30/Apr/2020

Have you noticed how many more people seem to be out and about – in the shops, on the road, walking in the park? And even though restrictions haven’t changed yet, many seem to have become a bit more relaxed when it comes to their activities and physical distancing?

While many of you have self-isolated in the past because of your musculoskeletal condition or other health reasons, what we’re all experiencing now is unprecedented. And for it to go on this long, with only a glimmer of light at the end of the tunnel, it’s no wonder we’re all going a little stir crazy.

There may be many reasons for this:

  • In Australia we’ve done exceptionally well at flattening the curve. But that means most of us don’t know anyone affected by COVID-19. So the virus doesn’t seem quite real to a lot of us.
  • We started iso thinking it was a chance to do the odds jobs, hobbies, reading, Marie Kondo-ing your space etc. And we’ve either done all of those things, or we’ve realised there was a reason we didn’t do them in the first place – we don’t want to! So now we’re getting a bit bored.
  • Decisions are being made that affect our lives, our families, our work and finances. And most of the time we have no say in these decisions. So we feel out of control.
  • The reality of home schooling, the chaos of everyone working from home, the isolation of being cooped up in your house alone, the constant internet and tech issues, fighting for space, the endless baking of banana bread…we’re over it.
  • We’re social beings, but we’re having to make do with virtual almost everything. But phone and video calls can’t compete with or replace the face-to-face connections with our family and loved ones. We want and miss our physical interactions.
  • All of the restrictions are a bit confusing – especially since every state/territory has their own specific set. So we’re confused, and a little jealous of the areas that are slowly easing restrictions.
  • We just want things to return to normal 😢.

But we really need to adhere to the restrictions in our state/territory.

It’s hard. But we’re up for the challenge 🙂. So when you start getting a bit itchy or grumpy or frustrated, here are some things you can do:

  • Remember why we’re doing this. Think of the health system and the frontline workers and essential services. Think of the vulnerable in our society (which may indeed be you or someone you care about).
  • Remember there are outliers. People have become very seriously ill or have died from this virus for reasons we don’t understand. There are still so many unknowns when it comes to COVID-19 – so not following the advice from our health officials will put you and others at risk.
  • Check the restrictions relevant to you. Visit the website of your state/territory health department so you know what you need to be doing.
    Australian Capital Territory
    New South Wales
    Northern Territory
    Queensland
    South Australia
    Tasmania 
    Victoria 
    Western Australia
  • Stick to your routine. Get up at the same time each day. Exercise regularly. Eat healthy meals. Plan time for fun and creative things you can do in and around your home.
  • Connect with others. Yes, we’re getting sick of our phones and computers (who thought they’d ever say that ??) but they’re the safest way for us to connect with the people important to us. So do it. Pick up the phone or get on your computer and make a call. Talk about anything other than the virus. Reminisce about fun times, silly things you’ve done together, jokes you’ve heard. It’s a great way to give yourself a lift when you’re feeling down. Contact the people you know are on their own and may be struggling. See how they’re doing and if you can help in any way. I know I keep saying it, but we really are in this together.
  • Set yourself a challenge or goal. It may involve looking after your health – e.g. exercising 30 minutes a day 5 days a week – or getting your finances in order, or starting an evening book club with the kids, or scheduling time each day to meditate/read/listen to music/relax, or plant a vegie garden, or doing that 3,000 piece jigsaw…Think of something you really want to do. Not the things you thought of at the start of iso, but something that seems more relevant to you 2 months into isolation – and set yourself the challenge to do that. If you encounter obstacles, that’s fine. Look for ways to manage them and move on.
  • Ignore the social media posts from the people who seem to be achieving amazing things during iso. You know the ones…they’ve learned a language, repainted their house, started a successful online business and written a book – all while working full time and home schooling 5 children under the age of 5. What a load of rubbish. Remember we generally use social media to present ourselves in the best light – it’s not always an accurate representation of what’s really happening. So take these posts with a grain of salt, or stop following them all together. It’s pointless comparing your situation with someone else’s. And it can make you feel stressed or inadequate, so try not to do it. You’re doing the best you can – so be kind to yourself.
  • Remember this will end.

Contact our free national Help Line

If you have questions about things like COVID-19, your musculoskeletal condition, treatment options, telehealthmanaging your pain or accessing services be sure to call our nurses. They’re available weekdays between 9am-5pm on 1800 263 265; email (helpline@msk.org.au) or via Messenger.


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22/Apr/2020

Feeling overwhelmed, exhausted, stressed and frustrated by 2020? You’re not alone! It’s been a bumpy ride so far. Filled with uncertainty, new pressures, lots of unknowns and a lack of control, many of us are feeling anxious, upset and vulnerable. When you have a musculoskeletal condition and live with regular pain and fatigue, the urge to retreat to your warm, cosy bed and pull the covers over your head can be very tempting.

But you’re strong – you’re a mighty warrior living with a chronic condition/s 🙂. You can take control of the situation and do something proactive by examining your self-care plan. Ask yourself – “is my pre-COVID self-care plan realistic now? Or does it need updating in light of the changes to my world?”

What is self-care

Self-care involves the things you deliberately do to take care of your physical, mental and emotional health and wellbeing. It’s the things you plan for (e.g. water exercise classes, visiting your specialist) and you make time for (e.g. mindfulness, taking your dog for a walk, talking with a friend).

You often see articles about self-care with pictures of day spas, yoga retreats and people exercising on the beach at sunset. All wonderful things to do to take care of your health – but when you live with a chronic condition, and you live with pain and sometimes crippling exhaustion, life’s not that glamorous.

So to create a self-care plan for yourself that’s realistic and achievable during isolation, throw those ideas out the window and let’s get real. Start by recognising and appreciating the things that you can do right now.

Some mornings it’s all you can do to get out of bed, let alone shower. So the very basics of self-care involve good quality sleep, a nutritious diet, exercise, looking after your mental health and keeping yourself and your home clean. If you have family, then you have that added responsibility as well, especially at the moment if you’re home schooling while juggling work.

So wow – that’s already a lot! So let’s break it down into bite-size chunks

Get some sleep

Easier said than done I hear you say. But getting good quality sleep is crucial for our everyday functioning. If it’s an issue for you, especially at the moment, part of your 2020 self-care plan may be to look at ways you can improve your sleep quality and quantity. We have resources to help you – including nurses you can speak to on our Help Line (see details at bottom) and info on our website. Or if it’s a problem you feel you need extra help with, talk with your doctor (in person or via a telehealth consultation) to get professional help.

Eat a healthy, nutritious diet

While it’s tempting when you’re feeling crappy to eat foods you think of as comforting (e.g chocolate, cheese, ice cream, biscuits, alcohol) you need to enjoy them in moderation. While they may make you happy for a while, it’s only temporary. Too much of a good thing can lead to weight gain and other health issues. Eating a variety of healthy foods, in a range of colours (eat the rainbow) will make you feel better overall and will give you more energy. And on the days you’re feeling great, prepare some healthy meals you can pop in the freezer for the days you’re feeling lousy.

Stay active

Exercise is so important when you have a chronic condition, but when you can no longer access your warm water exercise class or your tai chi group, finding a new exercise program can be daunting. If you’re looking online, it can sometimes be hard to judge if the exercise will help or hinder you. We’ve created some information about exercising during this time – including some tips about how you can stay active, as well as how to judge whether an online video or app is right for you. If you need some expert help and guidance, talk with your doctor about seeing an exercise physiologist, a physiotherapist or a sports and exercise physician. You can access them via a telehealth consultation or visit them in person.

Take care of your mental health

It’s really easy when you’re constantly surrounded by virus talk to become overwhelmed. Especially if you’re worried about your health, family, work and finances. And when you’re stressed and not looking after yourself properly, it can affect all aspects of your life including your family (and many of us are living in tight quarters at the moment), your ability to focus on work properly, sleep well, eat well…and so it becomes a vicious cycle.

The good news is there are lots of things you can do to look after your mental health during this time (read our blog for tips and strategies) including getting professional help if you need it. Again you can access the help you need in person or via a telehealth consultation. Talk with your doctor if you want more information about getting professional help.

But a really simple thing you can do immediately is to limit your exposure to all things COVID – pick a time when you’ll catch up on what’s happening – for example the evening news or morning bulletin – and then turn it off and tune it out.

Cleaning – plan, prioritise and pace

Cleaning – yourself, your kids, your home can be an enormous challenge. Hands up if there are days you feel like you need a nap after having a shower in the morning? It happens to most of us living with chronic pain at one time or another. For some more frequently than others. But the best thing you can do is to plan, prioritise and pace yourself.

Even before you get out of bed, while you’re lying in your cocoon, plan what you would like to do during the day. Maybe have a notepad and pen beside your bed, or use a note app on your phone and write it all down. OK, seeing it in one place, you can see that it’s a lot.

So now to the second P – prioritise. What are the things you really need to do? Do you really need to wash your hair today, or can you use the dry shampoo? Do you really need to vacuum the entire house, or just the living area? Do you really need to do 15,000 steps today, or do you need to take it down a notch. You know how you’re feeling on any given day – so plan, then prioritise.

Which then brings us to the 3rd P – pacing. Whatever you’re doing – cleaning, exercising, cooking, working, gardening, playing with the kids – pace yourself. It’s not a race – so be generous with your time, build in space for rest breaks.

And this brings us to the 4th P – peeing…after lying in bed thinking about all of this, you now need to rush to the loo 🤣

And finally, when it comes to cleaning – don’t forget hand washing. We need to do it regularly and thoroughly. We also need to be careful how we cough, sneeze and blow our noses. And avoid touching our face. Check out our hygiene 101 blog for more info.

Make time for the things you enjoy

When you’ve given the basics of your self-care plan some TLC and revised it for the current world, now take some time to consider other aspects of self-care. You may not have the time, energy or inclination to do these sorts of things most days, but schedule time to do the things that make you really happy, or relaxed, or pampered at least once a week – like a bubble bath, taking an hour to curl up with a good book, having a moment of peace and quiet in your garden to relax, doing a jigsaw puzzle, video chat with your bestie. We all need these moments to help us recharge, especially when life is so crazy and unsettled.

Contact our free national Help Line

Our nurses are available weekdays between 9am-5pm to take your calls (1800 263 265), emails (helpline@msk.org.au) or messages via Messenger. So if you have questions about things like COVID-19, your musculoskeletal condition, treatment options, telehealthmanaging your pain or accessing services – contact them today.

More to explore


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16/Apr/2020

Exercise is vital to our health, even while we’re in iso. It helps us manage our pain, our musculoskeletal conditions, our weight (especially with all the cooking we’re suddenly doing 😆) and our mental wellbeing.

But when you’re not able to go to your usual exercise classes, gym, sporting club or fitness centre – online videos and exercise apps seem like the answer. And with most of us in some form of isolation or quarantine, there’s been a proliferation of them being shared on social media and across the internet in general.

But they’re not all created equal. Some are purely videos to watch and follow, others are apps that provide more interaction and features. Some are free, while others require payment.

So before you pull on your leotard, buy a new thingamajig or sign up to that app, here are some things to think about:

  • What are the qualifications of the leader? Are they a qualified exercise professional – e.g. physiotherapist, exercise physiologist, fitness instructor? With many fitness and wellness centres closed because of COVID-19 many qualified instructors have moved online. This is great news (for us) as there’s only so much walking we can do. But there are also lots of well-meaning people with time on their hands posting exercise videos, as well as other people looking to make a quick buck. So make sure that the instructor is qualified to teach or lead exercise classes.
  • Are they catering to the general public or people with musculoskeletal conditions? Many general exercise videos or apps will be useful for all of us – musculoskeletal condition or not – especially if they’re gentle. But there are some exercises that may actually be harmful to you. And some that you shouldn’t try without a proper assessment from a qualified instructor as well as guidance to ensure you’re actually doing the exercise properly. To misquote the tagline from Alien – “in your lounge room, no one can hear you scream”…except for the other people in your household, your pets and the neighbours (the walls are thinner than you think!). The point is it can be very easy to hurt yourself if you’re not shown how to do some exercises correctly and safely, particularly if you have a musculoskeletal condition or another health issue.
  • Which leads to our next point – can you ask questions or get more info from the instructor? If you can, it gives you the ability to ask if they’ve instructed other people with your condition, make sure the exercises are safe for you to do, and get advice if you’re not quite sure you’re doing things correctly. If you can’t interact with them in any way, maybe look for another online exercise class/video/app.
  • What’s the cost? Is it free, or is there a fee? Or can you access a free basic version, and another version with additional features which you need to pay for? Is there a free trial period so you can make sure you actually like it? And if you do have to sign-up for anything, make sure you read all the fine print so you know exactly what you’re agreeing to.
  • Does your equipment support the tech? If you’re downloading an app, can your desktop, tablet, phone, watch etc handle it? Do you need to download additional software to use it? Are you prepared and/or able to do that?
  • Are you set up for it? Is your computer in a location that allows you room to exercise? If you only have a smartphone or tablet, can you view the exercise videos clearly? Is your internet able to cope with any downloads or streaming? If the answer to any of these is no, maybe look at alternatives formats such as DVDs. And with DVDs ask yourself all of these questions as well. There are a lot of good exercise DVDs and a lot of variety as far as types of exercise, but there are also a lot of dodgy ones. So take time to evaluate them carefully.
  • Is the exercise something you enjoy doing? If you don’t enjoy doing it, you’re unlikely to continue to do it. So find something that you find fun, engaging, challenging and enjoyable.
  • Can you set goals for yourself? Exercise needs to challenge you so you continue to get the health benefits. If it’s too easy, or doesn’t progress over time, you won’t see any improvements. Setting yourself SMART goals – Specific, Measureable, Achievable, Realistic and Timed – can help with this. Find out how you can create SMART goals.

There are a lot of things you can do to remain active during this pandemic and stay safe. Check out our blog about exercising during the pandemic. It has a range of different things you can do to stay active while isolated.

For more information, visit our website or call our MSK Help line weekdays on 1800 263 265. Or email helpline@msk.org.au.

More to explore


upside-down.jpg
01/Apr/2020

Our worlds have turned upside down and inside out. Just when you think you’re getting the hang of the new normal of isolation and staying at home, a new restriction comes into place. These restrictions are vital to help prevent the spread of a highly infectious virus, but they do make it hard to find your balance.

It’s no wonder most of us are feeling anxious, stressed, upset, angry, vulnerable and a whole host of other emotions. When you also have a musculoskeletal condition, especially if you’re immunocompromised, all of these emotions may be heightened.

That’s why as well as looking after our physical health, it’s really important we look after our mental health.

We’ve put together a list of many practical things you can do to look after your mental health during the pandemic.

A quick warning, this is a ridiculously long blog 😉 but there’s so much we wanted to share with you!

Read it all, or just read the bits that are relevant to you at the moment and revisit as things change.

Find a new routine

This will obviously depend on what you need to do in your day, if you have people depending on you, if you’re working from home, have school work (or need to help others with school work) etc.

It might help to sit down with the members of your household and create a calendar that includes everyone’s commitments and needs. Things to think about when creating your calendar:

  • Get everyone involved. We’re living together in close quarters at the moment, without many of our usual distractions, sports and our friends, so it’s vital that everyone feels that their needs matter and they’re being heard.
  • Include specific time for fun stuff, exercise and connecting with family and friends. Dust off the board games – who doesn’t like a good game of Twister, Monopoly or Yahtzee?
  • Keep your weekends separate – this is really important so that you can get your chores done (sadly the laundry doesn’t stop because of a pandemic) and you have time to do creative stuff, exercise, and get a break from the workday routine.
  • Be very clear on your hours. It’s really easy to lose track of time. If you find this happening, set reminders on your phone to alert you.

Stay informed

There’s a lot of information out there about COVID-19, which can add to our anxiety and stress. But we need to stay up-to-date with factual, current information. Visit the Australian Government website for the latest from the government. Visit our website, follow us on Facebook, and/or call our Help Line weekdays on 1800 263 265 or email our nurses helpline@msk.org.au for info and support.

And once you’re up-to-date, put the news away for a while. It really doesn’t help our mental state to continually check what’s happening. Consider having a specific time (or two) when you check the latest news, and then go back to doing other things.

Get some sleep

We often struggle with sleep at the best of times, because we live with chronic pain. Unfortunately anxiety and stress can make this worse. But it’s important that we do all we can to get some decent sleep. Our physical and mental wellbeing is inextricably linked to good quality sleep – and getting enough of it. Read our recent blog for some practical tips on getting a good night’s sleep.

The Conversation has also recently written a useful article about the importance of sleep, especially now: Sleep won’t cure the coronavirus but it can help our bodies fight it.

Exercise regularly

We’ve talked, and will continue to talk about the importance of staying active – both during a pandemic (still blows my mind to say that) and during normal times. It helps us sleep better, maintain our weight, manage our pain, reduces our risks of developing other health conditions, and it improves our mood. There’s very clear evidence that regular exercise reduces stress, anxiety and feelings of depression and boosts our self-esteem. So exercise outdoors if you can (while maintaining physical distancing), and exercise in and around your home. Read our blog about exercising during the pandemic.

Eat well

Hands up who’s eating more often, and more unhealthy food choices at the moment? 🙋‍♀️🙋‍♂️ Food is a comfort to us all…and when we’re feeling a bit lost many of us reach for the food that makes us happy. But remember this gratification is short lived. Try to stick to your usual meal times, and gather everyone together and discuss your day (as long as you’re all well). If you live alone, use one of the many apps available (e.g. House Party, Hangouts) and share a virtual meal with a friend or your family.

Be careful with alcohol and other drugs

The temptation may be there to drink a little more, or use other drugs to make you feel better. But any mood changes you may experience are temporary, and drugs and alcohol have a negative effect on our mental health and our wellbeing.

Stay connected

Many of us are feeling the effects of being isolated, even if we live with others. We’re missing our circle of friends, our various social groups, our workmates and our extended families. There are many ways we can stay connected and keep up with each other’s lives. The simplest way is to pick up the phone and call. Avoid discussing the doom and gloom of the news cycle if you can. Instead focus on the new things you’re doing, your triumphs, how you’ve been able to work through challenges. And if there is something really worrying you, or making you anxious or upset, discuss it with someone you trust. Don’t ignore it. Get it out in the open so you can deal with it. As well as calling people, use tech to connect. There are a ridiculous number of ways to connect with others using social media platforms and apps. If you’re not sure where to start, read From Houseparty to Hangouts, these apps can help you stay social in coronavirus isolation by ABC News.

Create something

Channel your inner creativity. It’s a great way to relieve stress, and distract yourself from the worries of the world. There are a lot of online tutorials and info to help you: write a poem/song/novel/blog; learn a craft/language/skill; grow a flower/herb/vegie garden; paint a landscape/portrait/abstract; organise your home/office/life; cook a new recipe.

The sky really is the limit. So ask yourself – what have you always wanted to do if you just had the time??

Turn off the screens/limit news

Although a lot of the tools we’re using to deal with this pandemic are online, we need to set ourselves limits. Too much screen time, too much news – it’s just not good for us. As with everything, moderation is key. Turn off the electronics and pick up a book, or go for a walk, weed the garden, do some deep breathing exercises, talk with someone, try mindfulness. Do anything else but look at your screen or the news…at least for a while.

Give yourself a break

Our world really is crazy at the moment, so it’s important to recognise that and give yourself a break. We’ve not had to deal with a pandemic on this scale before, so be kind to yourself, and if you have a bad day, or a meltdown, that’s ok, we’ve all done it. You’ll brush yourself off and keep on going. And if you feel like you’re not finding it as easy to move on, or get past these moments, it might be time to talk with your doctor about getting professional help.

Get help when you need it

This may be psychological help if you feel like you’re not coping emotionally, financial help if you’re worried about your money situation or legal help if you have some concerns about your employment rights, or you have questions about writing your Will or setting up Powers of Attorney. Getting expert advice can help relieve some anxiety.

Take heart

🧡We’ll get through this. We may have to change and adapt, but we will come out on the other side of this pandemic. We just have to be patient, follow the advice and guidance of our health professionals and the government, look after each other and be creative with how we live during these crazy times.

More to explore


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19/Mar/2020

Didn’t think we’d ever be writing those words!

Update – 28 April 2020. This blog has been updated in line with the new restrictions on gatherings and physical distancing, and to include a video from Dr Adam Castricum Sport and Exercise Physician on the importance of being physically active during isolation.

COVID-19 has had a massive impact on our worlds – our health, travel, work, finances, schooling, family life, and all the little freedoms we once took for granted. Isolation has seen our physical world become much smaller.

While we struggle with all of these things, an important area when it comes to our health that many of us are finding difficult to wrap our heads and bodies around is getting enough exercise.

If you live with a musculoskeletal condition like arthritis, back pain or osteoporosis you know how important exercise and being active is. It helps us manage our condition, our pain, our weight, and our mental health. It also helps us sleep better and gives us the opportunity to socialise with others.

However not being able to attend our classes, fitness centres and sporting clubs means we need to look at alternative ways to exercise.

Here’s a few ideas to help you stay active during the pandemic:

  • Schedule time for it. Our lives have turned upside down, so having a regular routine, including time for exercise is really important, for both our physical health, but also our mental health and wellbeing.
  • Exercise with others. Grab your family and go for a bike ride, walk around the park, shoot hoops in the driveway, play leapfrog on the lawn. Or connect with friends via video apps and exercise together. Along with having a regular time for exercise, having an exercise buddy – whether in person or online – will help keep you motivated and accountable.
  • Get outside and go for a walk, jog or run. It’s still a great way to stay active. If you’re doing it with a friend, make sure you’re abiding by the latest restrictions regarding gatherings and physical distancing. And don’t forget – COVID-19 doesn’t spread to our dogs, so take them for a walk. They’ll love it! And avoid walking, jogging or running in busy areas, or during busy times.
  • Use an old fashioned DVD and exercise in front of your TV. Or stream an exercise program online. Or use an exercise app. There are so many to choose from. Just make sure that the exercises are performed by people who know what they’re doing.
  • Dance around the house. Get the blood pumping with some of your favourite, high energy music, and shake it off!
  • Walk/run/skip around your home and yard – use the space you have available. At the beginning of the Chinese lockdown there was news of a man who ran a marathon in his own apartment! While you don’t have to go to that extreme, it highlights that you can do all kinds of things in small spaces if you’re a little creative 😊
  • If you have a WII Fit, or any of the electronic karaoke/guitar/music games that plug into your TV, set it up and go for it. Sing, dance and game to your hearts content. If you don’t have any of the electronics, just do some air guitar or air drumming. We’ve all done it, and it’s so much fun.
  • Get creative! One of our families has told us about how they’re blowing up balloons and using them as balls. For example, keeping them off the ground while they sit on opposite sides of the table, hitting balloons with fly swats and other improvised rackets for a game of tennis. We can be very creative when we need to be – let your inner exercise guru loose!
  • Use what you have around the house. You may already have exercise balls/bands and weights to use, or you can improvise with cans of soup for weights, steps ups on your stairs etc.
  • Incorporate incidental exercise. Check out our blog on how the little bits and pieces you do over the course of your day – for example cleaning, talking on the phone – can be made more active and really add up.
  • Go for a ride. Use an indoor stationary bike, or hit the streets or park on your bicycle.
  • Consider hiring or buying (new or second hand) exercise equipment such as a treadmill, exercise bike or cross-trainer. You can use the equipment to add variety to your exercise program, and it’ll also come in handy for those days it’s too wet or cold to venture outdoors.

There are lots of things you can do to remain active during this pandemic, and stay safe. These are just some of them. For more information, visit our website or call our MSK Help line weekdays on 1800 263 265. Or email helpline@msk.org.au.

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Musculoskeletal Australia (or MSK) is the consumer organisation working with, and advocating on behalf of, people with arthritis, osteoporosis, back pain, gout and over 150 other musculoskeletal conditions.

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