Managing your chronic illness

August 2, 2018 by Lisa Bywaters0
hands-1200x795.jpg

Gathering your all-star support team

Written by Amanda Sobey 

Attempting to take control of your chronic condition can at times be a daunting and uncertain challenge. Ensuring you have a strong team around you to help tackle each milestone, step by step, can make it feel achievable.

So who might be in your personal support team?

Health professionals

Depending on your individual needs, your team may be made up of a variety of health professionals. These could include your GP, rheumatology nurse, specialist, pharmacist, physiotherapist, rehabilitation practitioner, occupational therapist, nutritionist or dietitian, physiotherapist, remedial massage therapist, acupuncturist, health coach, counsellor, podiatrist, or your exercise physiologist. Share your goals with your health practitioner up front to maximise the limited time in your appointments and so they can help you progress.

Your personal cheer squad

Surrounding yourself with people who lift you up and encourage you to take charge of your condition can be empowering.

Family and friends

Let them know how they can help you and keep them in the loop as you go along. Let them celebrate the small wins with you. Examples could be receiving positive results of reduced inflammation from your latest blood test, that you managed to walk around the block comfortably, or that you had a pain-free night’s sleep. They might be able to help you hang out that load of washing or put a home cooked meal in your fridge. They can provide a second pair of ears when you need to off-load, question information you’ve been given or accompany you to your next medical appointment. They can also be great companions for a belly laugh, keeping active and getting out of the house!

Peer support group contacts

Being able to connect with people who are going through the same challenges can mean the world. This might be through online social networks or contacts you’ve made at meetups. Group members will be at various stages of their conditions. Some will be newly diagnosed, others may be long-time chronic illness warriors. They’ll be happy to share their experiences and provide insight based on what has helped them.

Studying?

Consider letting your teacher or course convenor know about your condition, so that they can provide assistance if you need to ask for an extension, or are unable to attend a class. It’s also worth finding out about other support services available at the school or university you are studying with.

In the workplace

If you feel comfortable, let your employer or HR Manager know about your condition so that they can provide flexibility, if and when you need it. They’ll be appreciative of any information you can share with them about your condition, so they know how best to help.

On the road to wellness

With the right support around you, taking control of your chronic condition can feel even more possible. Keep your care team in the loop, share your highs and lows and be sure to celebrate each milestone on your wellness journey.

Our guest blogger

Amanda Sobey is a co-founder of Young Adults with Arthritis+ (YAWA+), an online peer support network for young adults in Australia aged 18-35 with arthritis and related chronic conditions. Amanda was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis at age 22 and is passionate about raising awareness and helping others on their wellness journey.

For more information please visit the following links:

Facebook: www.facebook.com/yawaplus
Twitter: www.twitter.com/yawaplus
Instagram: www.instagram.com/youngadultswitharthritisplus



Musculoskeletal Australia (or MSK) is the consumer organisation working with, and advocating on behalf of, people with arthritis, osteoporosis, back pain, gout and over 150 other musculoskeletal conditions.

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Copyright by Musculoskeletal Australia 2018. All rights reserved.

ABN: 26 811 336 442ACN: 607 996 921

Managing your chronic illness

August 2, 2018 by Lisa Bywaters0
hands-1200x795.jpg

Gathering your all-star support team

Written by Amanda Sobey 

Attempting to take control of your chronic condition can at times be a daunting and uncertain challenge. Ensuring you have a strong team around you to help tackle each milestone, step by step, can make it feel achievable.

So who might be in your personal support team?

Health professionals

Depending on your individual needs, your team may be made up of a variety of health professionals. These could include your GP, rheumatology nurse, specialist, pharmacist, physiotherapist, rehabilitation practitioner, occupational therapist, nutritionist or dietitian, physiotherapist, remedial massage therapist, acupuncturist, health coach, counsellor, podiatrist, or your exercise physiologist. Share your goals with your health practitioner up front to maximise the limited time in your appointments and so they can help you progress.

Your personal cheer squad

Surrounding yourself with people who lift you up and encourage you to take charge of your condition can be empowering.

Family and friends

Let them know how they can help you and keep them in the loop as you go along. Let them celebrate the small wins with you. Examples could be receiving positive results of reduced inflammation from your latest blood test, that you managed to walk around the block comfortably, or that you had a pain-free night’s sleep. They might be able to help you hang out that load of washing or put a home cooked meal in your fridge. They can provide a second pair of ears when you need to off-load, question information you’ve been given or accompany you to your next medical appointment. They can also be great companions for a belly laugh, keeping active and getting out of the house!

Peer support group contacts

Being able to connect with people who are going through the same challenges can mean the world. This might be through online social networks or contacts you’ve made at meetups. Group members will be at various stages of their conditions. Some will be newly diagnosed, others may be long-time chronic illness warriors. They’ll be happy to share their experiences and provide insight based on what has helped them.

Studying?

Consider letting your teacher or course convenor know about your condition, so that they can provide assistance if you need to ask for an extension, or are unable to attend a class. It’s also worth finding out about other support services available at the school or university you are studying with.

In the workplace

If you feel comfortable, let your employer or HR Manager know about your condition so that they can provide flexibility, if and when you need it. They’ll be appreciative of any information you can share with them about your condition, so they know how best to help.

On the road to wellness

With the right support around you, taking control of your chronic condition can feel even more possible. Keep your care team in the loop, share your highs and lows and be sure to celebrate each milestone on your wellness journey.

Our guest blogger

Amanda Sobey is a co-founder of Young Adults with Arthritis+ (YAWA+), an online peer support network for young adults in Australia aged 18-35 with arthritis and related chronic conditions. Amanda was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis at age 22 and is passionate about raising awareness and helping others on their wellness journey.

For more information please visit the following links:

Facebook: www.facebook.com/yawaplus
Twitter: www.twitter.com/yawaplus
Instagram: www.instagram.com/youngadultswitharthritisplus