Saying goodbye to iso – easing restrictions

May 28, 2020 by Lisa Bywaters0

goodbye-iso.jpg

As we come to the end of May 2020, more and more restrictions are easing all over the country. And we’re being told more restrictions will be lifted in June and July. Yay!!

While we’re all understandably excited at the prospect of doing the things we took for granted pre-COVID, there are things we need be aware of. The fact is we’re not out of the woods. And we won’t really return to anything resembling the old ‘normal’ until we have a vaccine. 

So as you make your way out of the front door, blinking into the bright lights of the outside world, make sure you’re ready for it so you and your family stay safe, and you help keep the rest of the community safe.

What’s up with your hair? And what are you wearing?!?

OK so this is a little silly, but for many of us it’s been MONTHS since we’ve had a haircut or had a professional give our hair some TLC. So we’re looking a little wild and woolly. Add in the lack of access to beauty salons and we’re a weird, hairy mess – picture Cousin It from the Addams Family 😂. And for many of us we’ll need scissors and a crow bow to get the trackies and slippers off, because staying at home and trying not to spend too much on the heating bill has led to comfort and warmth winning over style and fashion. So maybe check yourself in a mirror before you venture out 😂

But seriously apart from sorting out our general dishevelment there are some important things to be aware of as our COVID isolation starts winding down and restrictions continue to lift:

Hygiene

It’s still incredibly important. Wash your hands thoroughly and regularly, use hand sanitisers, cough and sneeze into your elbow and avoid touching your face. For a refresher read our hygiene 101 blog for more info.

Physical distancing

We’re able to go to more places and see more people, however physical distancing is still vital. Most of us are still susceptible to this highly infectious virus, so we need to maintain at least 1.5 metres between ourselves and others when we’re out in public. This can sometimes be a bit tricky. With the loosening of restrictions, and because people have felt cooped up for so long, LOTS of people are going out. So you need to ask yourself when you pull into the shopping centre carpark and it’s full, or you can see a line of cars heading to the park you’re aiming for. Ask yourself if you’ll really be able to maintain a safe distance between yourself and others. And if the answer’s no, can you go somewhere else instead? Or do something else? Or come back at another, less busy time?

Gatherings

We’ve missed our family and friends, and although it was helpful, technology – with all the drop outs and weird pauses – can only do so much. We want to BE with our people. And we’re now allowed to do that in greater numbers. But you need to do a few things if/when your gather:

  • Know the relevant guidelines for your state/territory. It’s different all over the country, so it’s easy to get confused. So check the COVID-19 website applicable to where you live.
  • Only visit or have visitors if you’re healthy and well. Even if you’re chomping at the bit and you’re pretty sure it’s only a sore throat because of your allergies, or you think you’re feeling fatigued because of a late night/your MSK condition/home schooling, don’t take the chance. There may be a slim possibility that you actually have the virus and spread it to others – so don’t be that person.
  • No hugs, kisses or handshakes. This is a tough one, especially if you haven’t seen loved ones in ages, but resist the close contact. And it may seem lame but try the elbow bump or foot tap greeting. Better still, make up your own family greeting. Get the kids involved and make it something fun and uniquely yours.

Your mental health

It’s been such a crazy time, and we’ve been isolated in our own cocoons for so long, many of us may be a little anxious or scared about going out. That’s completely understandable. But we do need to go out – for work, groceries, social connection, exercise, healthcare appointments – we need it all.

However if you do feel anxious about heading out into the world, it’s important to understand why you’re feeling this way and then look for ways you can manage it. For example if you’re freaked out by the crowds at the supermarket, try and do your shopping at quieter times. If you’re concerned about using public transport, follow the capacity restrictions for the specific mode of transport, wash your hands after using it (or use hand sanitiser if you have it) and avoid touching your face.

The important thing is to start easing your way back into the world. But if you’re having real issues getting out, talk with your doctor. You may need some professional support. You can do this via telehealth from the comfort of your own home.

There will be outbreaks

That’s inevitable, but we can all do our best to reduce the risk of an outbreak with good hygiene, physical distancing and staying home if you feel unwell.

Exercise venues

Pools, indoor and outdoor gyms and fitness centres are also reopening. This’s great news. We all need a variety of exercises for our general health and wellbeing, and to help us manage our musculoskeletal condition and pain. There are strict guidelines for all public venues about maximum numbers, physical distancing and hygiene that exercise facilities will need to be following. So if your venue hasn’t contacted you to let you know how they’re keeping their clients and staff safe, contact them and ask.

Staying safe with a musculoskeletal condition

If you have arthritis, back pain or osteoporosis, you may need to be careful about a few other things.

  • With more places opening up, venue owners are trying to find ways to enforce physical distancing and capacity measures. However some of the makeshift barriers being used may cause a trip hazard for some of us – because they’re low and not very brightly coloured – for example the humble milk crate or cardboard box. They seem to be a handy partition used in many places to limit the number of people in a space and to direct the flow of traffic. But they’re not always easy to see, especially if there’s poor lighting or you’re hurrying – so be careful of trip hazards and other obstacles when you’re out and about to reduce your risk of falling and getting hurt.
  • You may need to stand in queues, at the supermarket, hardware store and other public venues that are reopening, as they all have a maximum number of people they can let in at one time. This can cause or exacerbate pain and fatigue for many people with musculoskeletal conditions. So wear comfy shoes (including orthotics if you have/need them), grab your walking aid, your shopping list (a foggy brain makes remembering almost impossible) and your shopping buggy/bags. And be kind to yourself as you may feel tired and exhausted for some time after your trip. If your battery was already low before you tackled this, it’s may take some time to feel yourself again.

With restrictions lifting all over the country, we’re getting excited about broadening our horizons beyond our own front doors. But we need to take responsibility and be careful. We’ve done really well at minimising the impact of this virus on Australians – and we don’t want to slide backwards.

So stay informed, follow the guidance of the government health officers, and we’ll get through this next phase of the COVID journey.

Contact our free national Help Line

If you have questions about things like COVID-19, your musculoskeletal condition, treatment options, telehealthmanaging your pain or accessing services be sure to call our nurses. They’re available weekdays between 9am-5pm on 1800 263 265; email (helpline@msk.org.au) or via Messenger.



Musculoskeletal Australia (or MSK) is the consumer organisation working with, and advocating on behalf of, people with arthritis, osteoporosis, back pain, gout and over 150 other musculoskeletal conditions.

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